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Terminal - All commands - 12,130 results
for /F %G in ('dir /b c:\Windows\system32\notepad.exe') do ( echo %G )
shuf file.txt | head -n 1
xterm -e "cd /my/directory; bash"
2009-10-13 12:06:14
User: kekschaot
-4

Usefull e.g. in krusader open terminal function

( cd /my/directory; xterm& )
2009-10-13 13:07:21
User: ashawley
Functions: cd
Tags: subshells
-4

Perfect time for the rarely used sub shell.

aptitude purge linux-image | grep ^i | grep -v $(uname -r)
cat data.json >data.yml
2013-04-25 04:09:58
User: Mozai
Functions: cat
Tags: json yaml
-4

Valid JSON is a subset of YAML; no transformation is necessary; however, YAML has many syntax features that are not valid JSON, so you can't do the reverse as easily.

sleep 4h && halt
uname -m # display machine "hardware name"
2013-01-04 11:46:43
User: mpb
Functions: uname
-4

Display the machine "hardware name" 32 or 64 bit.

"x86_64" is shown on 64 bit machines

"i686" is typically shown on 32 bit machines (although, you might also see "i386" or "i586" on older Linuxen).

On other "unix-like" systems, other hardware names will be displayed.

For example, on AIX, "uname -m" gives the "machine sequence number".

For whatever reason, IBM decided that "uname -M" would give the machine type and model.

(ref: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-aix-systemid.html )

On Sun Solaris, "uname -m" can be used to determine the chip type and "isainfo -v" will reveal

if the kernel is 64 or 32 bit.

(ref: http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/packages/solaris/sparc/html/32.and.64.bit.packages.html )

A more reliable way to determine "64-bit ness" across different Unix type systems is to compile the following simple C program:

cat <<eeooff > bits.c

/*

* program bits.c

* purpose Display "32" or "64" according to machine type

* written January 2013

* reference http://www.unix.org/whitepapers/64bit.html

*/

/* hmm, curious that angle-brackets removed by commandlinefu.com data input processing? */

#include "/usr/include/stdio.h"

long lv = 0xFFFFFFFF;

main ( ) {

printf("%2d\n",(lv < 0)?32:64);

}

eeooff

Compile and run thusly: cc -o bits bits.c; ./bits

<command> 2> <file>
ps aux | grep -v `whoami`
echo '#!'$(which bash) > script.sh
2012-02-06 08:25:27
User: sharfah
Functions: echo which
Tags: bash
-4

Writes out the shebang line (#!/bin/bash) to the script.

ls | xargs WHATEVER_COMMAND
2014-03-12 18:00:21
User: pdxdoughnut
Functions: ls xargs
-4

xargs will automatically determine how namy args are too many and only pass a reasonable number of them at a time. In the example, 500,002 file names were split across 26 instantiations of the command "echo".

php -r 'echo md5("password") . "\n";'
ls -l|awk '{print $6,$8}'|sort -d
2009-03-13 19:00:18
User: archlich
Functions: awk ls sort
-4

Can pipe to tail or change the awk for for file size, groups, users, etc.

10,30,50 * * * * ping -q -c1 -w3 192.168.0.14 | grep '1 received' - || mail -ne -s'Host 192.168.0.14 not reachable' admin@example.com
2012-02-06 10:42:46
User: knoppix5
Functions: grep mail ping
-4

Every 20 minutes test if host with IP 192.168.0.14 is 'dead' or not reachable.

The line should be put in your crontab file.

for file in $(seq -f '%03.f' 1 $TOTAL ); do echo "($file/$TOTAL)"; curl -f -O http://domain.com/Name_$file.ext; done
2010-01-12 15:23:44
User: nordri
Functions: echo file seq
-4

With counter format [001, 002, ..., 999] , nice with pictures or wallpapers collections.

for i in *; do echo '"'$i'"'; done
find /etc -exec grep '[0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*' {} \;
mkdir 0{0..9}{0..9};mv 000 100
2009-08-14 16:33:20
User: sitaram
Functions: mkdir
-4

no external commands, but can only do 0-99, not 1-100, so we adjust it later

ps -xaw -o state,ppid | grep Z | grep -v PID | awk '{ print $2 }' | xargs kill -9
2013-01-09 04:21:54
User: terrywang
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs
-4

Did some research and found the previous command wrong, we don't kill a zombie but its parent. Just made some modifcation to khashmeshab's command.

ls -F | grep '\''\*'\'' | sed '\''s/\*$//'\
service mysqld restart
2013-12-18 19:13:56
User: denni
-4

This command restarts mysql service.

ls -Sl * | head
2009-03-27 23:20:32
User: colinpj
Functions: ls
-4

head by default displays first ten lines of its output. Use 'head -nXX' to display the XX largest files

echo 'mkcd() { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$_"; }' >> ~/.bashrc
2010-01-13 09:37:56
User: phaidros
Functions: cd echo mkdir
-4

combines mkdir and cd

added quotes around $_, thanx to flatcap!

nc -w 5 -v -l -p 80 < file.ext