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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 350 results
find . -type d -name '*[A-Z]*' -execdir bash -c '! test -f "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \; -execdir bash -c 'mv "$0" "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \;
find ${PATH//:/ } -iname "*admin*" -executable -type f
2010-03-29 10:20:07
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find
Tags: bash find unix
1

While it seems (to me at least) a little counter-intuitive to filter on name first, this requires less work for find, as it allows it to immediately discount any files that do not match the name directly from the directory listing on disk. Querying against file attributes requires reading the file attributes, which is performed for all files matching any name based predicates.

find * \( -name "*.[hc]pp" -or -name "*.py" -or -name "*.i" \) -print0 | xargs -0 wc -l | tail -n 1
2010-03-25 18:58:29
User: neologism
Functions: find tail wc xargs
Tags: find xargs wc
1

Finds all C++, Python, SWIG files in your present directory (uses "*" rather than "." to exclude invisibles) and counts how many lines are in them. Returns only the last line (the total).

find . -type f -name '*.mp3' -execdir mp3gain -a '{}' +
2010-03-21 22:23:44
Functions: find
1

This normalizes volume in your mp3 library, but uses mp3gain's "album" mode. This applies a gain change to all files from each directory (which are presumed to be from the same album) - so their volume relative to one another is changed, while the average album volume is normalized. This is done because if one track from an album is quieter or louder than the others, it was probably meant to be that way.

echo $(( `ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l` ))
2010-03-12 08:42:49
User: AskApache
Functions: echo wc
1

There is a limit to how many processes you can run at the same time for each user, especially with web hosts. If the maximum # of processes for your user is 200, then the following sets OPTIMUM_P to 100.

OPTIMUM_P=$(( (`ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l`) / 2 ))

This is very useful in scripts because this is such a fast low-resource-intensive (compared to ps, who, lsof, etc) way to determine how many processes are currently running for whichever user. The number of currently running processes is subtracted from the high limit setup for the account (see limits.conf, pam, initscript).

An easy to understand example- this searches the current directory for shell scripts, and runs up to 100 'file' commands at the same time, greatly speeding up the command.

find . -type f | xargs -P $OPTIMUM_P -iFNAME file FNAME | sed -n '/shell script text/p'

I am using it in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html especially for the xargs command. Xargs has a -P option that lets you specify how many processes to run at the same time. For instance if you have 1000 urls in a text file and wanted to download all of them fast with curl, you could download 100 at a time (check ps output on a separate [pt]ty for proof) like this:

cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}'

I like to do things as fast as possible on my servers. I have several types of servers and hosting environments, some with very restrictive jail shells with 20processes limit, some with 200, some with 8000, so for the jailed shells my xargs -P10 would kill my shell or dump core. Using the above I can set the -P value dynamically, so xargs always works, like this.

cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}'

If you were building a process-killer (very common for cheap hosting) this would also be handy.

Note that if you are only allowed 20 or so processes, you should just use -P1 with xargs.

find . -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -type f
2010-03-11 01:22:06
User: lucasrangit
Functions: find
2

Find C/C++ source files and headers in the current directory.

alias busy='my_file=$(find /usr/include -type f | sort -R | head -n 1); my_len=$(wc -l $my_file | awk "{print $1}"); let "r = $RANDOM % $my_len" 2>/dev/null; vim +$r $my_file'
2010-03-09 21:48:41
User: busybee
Functions: alias awk find head sort vim wc
22

This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

find -type f -exec mv {} . \;
2010-03-02 07:09:45
User: and3k
Functions: find mv
9

Find every file and move it to current directory.

find ./ -name '*.sw[op]' -delete
find . -name "*~" -exec rm {} \;
2010-02-26 10:54:02
User: ivanatora
Functions: find rm
Tags: vim find
-5

Assuming only VIM has *~ files in your current dir. If you have usefull data in a file named in the *~ pattern, DO NOT RUN this command!

find -type f -regex ".*\.\(js\|php\|inc\|htm[l]?\|css\)$" -exec grep -il 'searchstring' '{}' +
find . -type f \( -name "*.js" -o -name "*.php" -o -name "*.inc" -o -name "*.html" -o -name "*.htm" -o -name "*.css" \) -exec grep -il 'searchString' {} \;
2010-02-07 15:28:20
User: niels_bom
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep search
-1

Use find to recursively make a list of all files from the current directory and downwards. The files have to have an extension of the ones listed. Then for every file found, grep it for 'searchString', returns the filename if searchString is found.

find /path/to/dir -type f -printf "%T@|%p\n" 2>/dev/null | sort -n | tail -n 1| awk -F\| '{print $2}'
newest () { find ${1:-\.} -type f |xargs ls -lrt ; }
newest () { DIR=${1:-'.'}; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -type f|head -n1`; while [[ ! -z $CANDIDATE ]]; do BEST=$CANDIDATE; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -newer "$BEST" -type f|head -n1`; done; echo "$BEST"; }
2010-02-04 12:40:44
User: shadycraig
Functions: echo head
1

Works recusivley in the specified dir or '.' if none given.

Repeatedly calls 'find' to find a newer file, when no newer files exist you have the newest.

In this case 'newest' means most recently modified. To find the most recently created change -newer to -cnewer.

find . -type f |xargs -I% sed -i '/group name/s/>/ deleteMissing="true">/' %
2010-02-01 21:09:57
User: 4fthawaiian
Functions: find sed xargs
1

Changed out the for loop for an xargs. It's a tad shorter, and a tad cleaner.

for i in `find . -type f`; do sed -i '/group name/s/>/ deleteMissing="true">/' $i; done
2010-02-01 17:16:37
User: allrightname
Functions: sed
0

Recursively replace a string in files with lines matching string. Lines with the string "group name" will have the first > character replaced while other > characters on other lines will be ignored.

find directory/ -exec grep -ni phrase {} +
2010-01-28 12:15:24
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
0

The difference between this and the other alternatives here using only grep is that find will, by default, not follow a symlink. In some cases, this is definitely desirable.

Using find also allows you to exclude certain files, eg

find directory/ ! -name "*.tmp" -exec grep -ni phrase {} +

would allow you to exclude any files .tmp files.

Also note that there's no need for calling grep recursively, as find passes each found file to grep.

find -type d -name ".svn" -prune -o -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type d -name ".svn" -prune -o -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
2010-01-28 09:45:29
User: 2chg
Functions: find md5sum sort uniq xargs
2

Improvement of the command "Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)" when searching for duplicate files in a directory containing a subversion working copy. This way the (multiple dupicates) in the meta-information directories are ignored.

Can easily be adopted for other VCS as well. For CVS i.e. change ".svn" into ".csv":

find -type d -name ".csv" -prune -o -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type d -name ".csv" -prune -o -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
find . -type d -empty -delete
find /path/to/images -name '*.JPG' -exec bash -c 'mv "$1" "${1/%.JPG/.jpg}"' -- {} \;
2010-01-07 15:41:17
User: sorpigal
Functions: bash find
Tags: bash find mv
7

Recursively rename .JPG to .jpg using standard find and mv. It's generally better to use a standard tool if doing so is not much more difficult.

find /path/to/images -name '*.JPG' -exec rename "s/.JPG/.jpg/g" \{\} \;
2010-01-02 19:12:37
User: renich
Functions: find rename
Tags: find rename
8

This command is useful for renaming a clipart, pic gallery or your photo collection. It will only change the big caps to small ones (on the extension).

find . -type f -exec sed -i s/oldstring/newstring/g {} +
2009-12-09 00:46:13
User: SlimG
Functions: find sed
Tags: sed find
14

This command find all files in the current dir and subdirs, and replace all occurances of "oldstring" in every file with "newstring".

find . -type d -exec sh -c "normalize-audio -b \"{}\"/*.mp3" \;
2009-12-08 03:13:13
Functions: find sh
-2

Execute this in the root of your music library and this recurses through the directories and normalizes each folder containing mp3s as a batch. This assumes those folders hold an album each. The command "normalize-audio" may go by "normalize" on some systems.

grep -H -n "pattern" *
2009-11-24 08:48:38
Functions: grep
Tags: find
0

if its the current directory, no need find command. just grep will do