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Commands using mv from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using mv - 180 results
for z in */*.pdf; do gs -q -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -sOutputFile="$z new" -c .setpdfwrite -f "$z" mv "$z new" "$z"; done
for f in * ; do mv "$f" $( echo $f | tr ' ' '-' ) ; done
cd ~/Desktop && for FILES in $(ls); do mv $FILES .${FILES}; done
for i in $(find . -iname '*.html'); do sed '/String/d' $i > $i-tmp; mv $i-tmp $i; done
2010-09-21 14:35:18
User: cadu
Functions: find mv sed
Tags: sed find
-3

Search in all html files and remove the lines that 'String' is found.

sleep 4; xwd >foo.xwd; mv foo.xwd "$(dd skip=100 if=foo.xwd bs=1 count=256 2>/dev/null | egrep -ao '^[[:print:]]+' | tr / :).xwd"
2010-09-19 08:03:02
User: hackerb9
Functions: mv sleep
3

In general, this is actually not better than the "scrot -d4" command I'm listing it as an alternative to, so please don't vote it down for that. I'm adding this command because xwd (X window dumper) comes with X11, so it is already installed on your machine, whereas scrot probably is not. I've found xwd handy on boxen that I don't want to (or am not allowed to) install packages on.

NOTE: The dd junk for renaming the file is completely optional. I just did that for fun and because it's interesting that xwd embeds the window title in its metadata. I probably should have just parsed the output from file(1) instead of cutting it out with dd(1), but this was more fun and less error prone.

NOTE2: Many programs don't know what to do with an xwd format image file. You can convert it to something normal using NetPBM's xwdtopnm(1) or ImageMagick's convert(1). For example, this would work: "xwd | convert fd:0 foo.jpg". Of course, if you have ImageMagick already installed, you'd probably use import(1) instead of xwd.

NOTE3: Xwd files can be viewed using the X Window UnDumper: "xwud <foo.xwd". ImageMagick and The GIMP can also read .xwd files. Strangely, eog(1) cannot.

NOTE4: The sleep is not strictly necessary, I put it in there so that one has time to raise the window above any others before clicking on it.

ram() { for i in /tmp /altroot;do mount -t tmpfs tmpfs $i;done&& for i in /var /root /etc $HOME; do find -d $i |cpio -pdmv /tmp&& mount -t tmpfs tmpfs $i&& mv -v /tmp$i/* $i&& rm -vrf /tmp$i ; done ;} usage: (in rc sequence) ram
2010-08-31 08:25:55
User: argv
Functions: cpio find mount mv rm
4

if you use disk-based swap then it can defeat the purpose of this function.

declare -i i=0 ; for file in * ; do i=$[$i+1] ; mv "$file" $i; done
declare -i i; i=0; for file in *; do i=`expr $i+1`; mv "$file" $i; done;
2010-08-26 12:24:38
User: themiurgo
Functions: file mv
-5

Renames files in a directory to incremental numbers, following alphabetic order. The command does not maintain extensions.

sed 's/^[ \t]*//;s/[ \t]*$//' < <file> > <file>.out; mv <file>.out <file>
sed 's/^[ \t]*//' < <file> > <file>.out; mv <file>.out <file>
sed 's/[ \t]*$//' < <file> > <file>.out; mv <file>.out <file>
for i in $(find . -name *replaceme*);do mv "$i" "${i//replaceme/withme}"; done
2010-08-19 03:22:15
User: lefnire
Functions: find mv
Tags: bash
-6

rename is a great command, but can't get it to work on mac.

for i in *; do mv $i prependtext$i; done
ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo "prependtext$FILE" `; done
2010-08-14 14:19:18
User: IgnitionWeb
Functions: ls mv read
Tags: echo mv prepen
-4

Prepends all directory items with "prependtext"

ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo $FILE | tr -d ' '`; done
2010-08-14 14:10:48
User: IgnitionWeb
Functions: ls mv read tr
Tags: space echo while tr
-3

all files in the directory get moved, in doing so the new name of the file is the original name with out spaces (using translate command)

file /music/dir/* | grep -v 44.1 | sed 's/:.*//g' | grep .mp3 | { while IFS= read; do filebak="\"$REPLY.original\""; file="\"$REPLY\""; mv $file $filebak; sox -t mp3 $filebak $file rate 44k; done; };
2010-08-12 21:53:28
User: IgnitionWeb
Functions: file grep mv sed
Tags: mp3 sox resample
-2

This heavy one liner gets all the files in the "/music/dir/" directory and filters for non 44.1 mp3 files. After doing this it passes the names to sox in-order to re-sample those files. The original files are left just in case.

find ./* -mtime +60 -exec mv {} storeFolder \;
read -p "enter url:" a ; w3m -dump $a > /dev/shm/e1q ; less /dev/shm/e1q ; read -p "save file as text (y/n)?" b ; if [ $b = "y" ] ; then read -p "enter path with filename:" c && touch $(eval echo "$c") ; mv /dev/shm/e1q $(eval echo "$c") ; fi ; echo DONE
2010-07-13 22:36:38
User: LinuxMan
Functions: c++ echo eval less mv read touch
0

Thanks th John_W for suggesting the fix allowing ~/ to be used when saving a directory.

directions:

Type in a url, it will show a preview of what the file will look like when saved, then asks if you want to save the preview and where you want to save it. Great for grabbing the latest commandlinefu commands without a full web browser or even a GUI. Requires: w3m

variable="foo" && sed 's/bar/'$variable'/g' $variable.conf >> $variable.temp && sed '1,5d' $variable.temp && mv $variable.temp $variable.conf
2010-07-09 22:12:51
User: jdorfman
Functions: mv sed
Tags: bash sed nginx
0

I wrote this script to speed up Nginx configs. This (long) one liner can be run via BASH. You will see that we set a variable in bash called 'foo' and the streamline editor (sed) finds 'bar' in 'foo.conf' next it writes that output to a temp file (foo.temp) and removes the first 5 lines (that aren't needed in this case) & lastly it moves (overwrites) foo.temp to foo.conf

for x in *.dat;do sort -k 3 $x >tmp && mv -f tmp $x;done
2010-07-07 07:57:37
User: rajarshi
Functions: mv sort
Tags: sorting
-2

We normally get tasks in which one has to sort a data file according to some column. For a single file say foo, we would use

sort -k 3 foo >tmp && tmp foo

The for loop is useful when we have to do it on a number of files.

find ~ -maxdepth 20 -type f -size -16M -print > t; for ((i=$(wc -l < t); i>0; i--)) do a=$(sed -n ${i}p < t); mv "$a" /dev/shm/d; mv /dev/shm/d "$a"; echo $i; done; echo DONE; rm t
2010-07-07 04:29:22
User: LinuxMan
Functions: echo find mv rm sed wc
2

Thanks to flatcap for optimizing this command.

This command takes advantage of the ext4 filesystem's resistance to fragmentation.

By using this command, files that were previously fragmented will be copied / deleted / pasted essentially giving the filesystem another chance at saving the file contiguously. ( unlike FAT / NTFS, the *nix filesystem always try to save a file without fragmenting it )

My command only effects the home directory and only those files with your R/W (read / write ) permissions.

There are two issues with this command:

1. it really won't help, it works, but linux doesn't suffer much (if any ) fragmentation and even fragmented files have fast I/O

2. it doesn't discriminate between fragmented and non-fragmented files, so a large ~/ directory with no fragments will take almost as long as an equally sized fragmented ~/ directory

The benefits i managed to work into the command:

1. it only defragments files under 16mb, because a large file with fragments isn't as noticeable as a small file that's fragmented, and copy/ delete/ paste of large files would take too long

2. it gives a nice countdown in the terminal so you know how far how much progress is being made and just like other defragmenters you can stop at any time ( use ctrl+c )

3. fast! i can defrag my ~/ directory in 11 seconds thanks to the ramdrive powering the command's temporary storage

bottom line:

1. its only an experiment, safe ( i've used it several times for testing ), but probably not very effective ( unless you somehow have a fragmentation problem on linux ). might be a placebo for recent windows converts looking for a defrag utility on linux and won't accept no for an answer

2. it's my first commandlinefu command

HTMLTEXT=$( curl -s http://www.page.de/test.html > /tmp/new.html ; diff /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html ); if [ "x$HTMLTEXT" != x ] ; then echo $HTMLTEXT | mail -s "Page has changed." mail@mail.de ; fi ; mv /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html
2010-07-04 21:45:37
User: Emzy
Functions: diff echo mail mv
2

Checks if a web page has changed. Put it into cron to check periodically.

Change http://www.page.de/test.html and mail@mail.de for your needs.

sudo find . -maxdepth 1 -cnewer olderFilesNameToMove -and ! -cnewer newerFileNameToMove -exec mv -v {} /newDirectory/ \;
2010-06-30 20:40:30
User: javamaniac
Functions: find mv sudo
2

In a folder with many files and folders, you want to move all files where the date is >= the file olderFilesNameToMove and

for n in * ; do mv $n `echo $n | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]'`; done
2010-06-25 19:20:04
User: max_allan
Functions: mv tr
1

Simple bash/ksh/sh command to rename all files from lower to upper case. If you want to do other stuff you can change the tr command to a sed or awk... and/or change mv to cp....

for i in somefiles*.png ; do echo "$i" ; N=$(stat -c %Y $i); mv -i $i $N.png; done
2010-06-01 19:28:05
User: sufoo
Functions: echo mv stat
0

This renames a pattern matched bunch of files by their last modified time.

rename by timestamp

rename by time created

rename by time modified