Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

2011-03-12 - Confoo 2011 presentation
Slides are available from the commandlinefu presentation at Confoo 2011: http://presentations.codeinthehole.com/confoo2011/
2011-01-04 - Moderation now required for new commands
To try and put and end to the spamming, new commands require moderation before they will appear on the site.
2010-12-27 - Apologies for not banning the trolls sooner
Have been away from the interwebs over Christmas. Will be more vigilant henceforth.
2010-09-24 - OAuth and pagination problems fixed
Apologies for the delay in getting Twitter's OAuth supported. Annoying pagination gremlin also fixed.
Hide

Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands using sort from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sort - 637 results
find . -type f -exec ls -s {} \; | sort -n -r | head -5
find /some/path -type f -printf '%f\n' | grep -o '\..\+$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2013-03-18 14:42:29
User: skkzsh
Functions: find grep sort uniq
2

Get the longest match of file extension (Ex. For 'foo.tar.gz', you get '.tar.gz' instead of '.gz')

find /some/path -type f | gawk -F/ '{print $NF}' | gawk -F. '/\./{print $NF}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2013-03-18 14:40:26
User: skkzsh
Functions: find gawk sort uniq
0

If you have GNU findutils, you can get only the file name with

find /some/path -type f -printf '%f\n'

instead of

find /some/path -type f | gawk -F/ '{print $NF}'
for i in `gpg --list-sigs | perl -ne 'if(/User ID not found/){s/^.+([a-fA-F0-9]{8}).*/\1/; print}' | sort | uniq`; do gpg --keyserver-options no-auto-key-retrieve --recv-keys $i; done
2013-03-10 09:15:15
User: hank
Functions: gpg perl sort
Tags: bash GPG sed fetch
0

The original command doesn't work for me - does something weird with sed (-r) and xargs (-i) with underscores all over...

This one works in OSX Lion. I haven't tested it anywhere else, but if you have bash, gpg and perl, it should work.

prlimit --cpu=10 sort -u hugefile
2013-02-27 15:59:11
User: mhs
Functions: sort
Tags: cpu util-linux
4

Similar to `cpulimit`, although `prlimit` can be found shipped with recent util-linux.

Example: limit CPU consumption to 10% for a math problem which ordinarily takes up 100% CPU:

Before:

bc -l <(echo "1234123412341234^12341234")

See the difference `prlimit` makes:

prlimit --cpu=10 bc -l <(echo "1234123412341234^12341234")

To actually monitor the CPU usage, use `top`, `sar`, etc.. or:

pidstat -C 'bc' -hur -p ALL 1
find . -type f -size +0 -printf "%-25s%p\n" | sort -n | uniq -D -w 25 | sed 's/^\w* *\(.*\)/md5sum "\1"/' | sh | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
2013-02-23 20:44:20
User: jimetc
Functions: find sed sh sort uniq
0

Avoids the nested 'find' commands but doesn't seem to run any faster than syssyphus's solution.

dpkg-query -Wf '${Installed-Size}\t${Package}\n' | grep "\-dev" | sort -n | awk '{ sum+=$1} END {print sum/1024 "MB"}'
du --max-depth=1 -h * |sort -h -k 1 |egrep '(M|G)\s'
2013-02-14 08:56:56
User: TerDale
Functions: du egrep sort
1

Enhanced version: fixes sorting by human readable numbers, and filters out non MB or GB entries that have a G or an M in their name.

ls -a | du --max-depth=1 -h 2>/dev/null |sort -h
du -hs * | sort -h
2013-02-12 15:29:26
Functions: du sort
Tags: disk usage
2

Show sizes of all files and directories in a directory in size order.

du -hs * | sort -hr

for reverse order.

Taken from http://serverfault.com/questions/62411/how-can-i-sort-du-h-output-by-size

du --max-depth=1 -h * |sort -n -k 1 |egrep 'M|G'
whatis $(compgen -c) | sort | less
2013-02-01 09:13:56
User: michelsberg
Functions: sort whatis
2

I like it sorted...

2> /dev/null was also needless, since our pipes already select stdin, only.

sort file.txt | uniq -c | sort -k1nr -k2d
2013-01-28 22:21:05
User: westonruter
Functions: sort uniq
Tags: bash sorting
0

I used to do this sorting with:

sort file.txt | uniq -c | sort -nr

But this would cause the line (2nd column) to be sorted in descending (reverse) order as well sa the 1st column. So this will ensure the 2nd column is in ascending alphabetical order.

find-duplicates () { find "$@" -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\0" | sort -rnz | uniq -dz | xargs -0 -I{} -n1 find "$@" -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate; }
2013-01-23 23:20:26
User: mpeschke
Functions: find md5sum sort uniq xargs
0

This is a modified version of the OP, wrapped into a bash function.

This version handles newlines and other whitespace correctly, the original has problems with the thankfully rare case of newlines in the file names.

It also allows checking an arbitrary number of directories against each other, which is nice when the directories that you think might have duplicates don't have a convenient common ancestor directory.

for i in {a..z}; do echo $(cat ~/.bash_history | grep ^$i.* | wc -l) $i; done | sort -n -r
2013-01-23 18:59:13
User: yaMatt
Functions: cat echo grep sort wc
0

Kind of fun if you're that was inclined. I figured most of my commands start with s. sudo, screen, ssh etc. This script tells me what else they start with.

find $folder -name "[1-9]*" -type f -print|while read file; do echo $file $(sed -e '/^$/Q;:a;$!N;s/\n //;ta;s/ /_/g;P;D' $file|awk '/^Received:/&&!r{r=$0}/^From:/&&!f{f=$0}r&&f{printf "%s%s",r,f;exit(0)}');done|sort -k 2|uniq -d -f 1
2013-01-21 22:50:51
User: lpb612
Functions: awk echo find read sed sort uniq
2

# find assumes email files start with a number 1-9

# sed joins the lines starting with " " to the previous line

# gawk print the received and from lines

# sort according to the second field (received+from)

# uniq print the duplicated filename

# a message is viewed as duplicate if it is received at the same time as another message, and from the same person.

The command was intended to be run under cron. If run in a terminal, mutt can be used:

mutt -e "push otD~=xq" -f $folder

largest() { dir=${1:-"./"}; count=${2:-"10"}; echo "Getting top $count largest files in $dir"; du -sx "$dir/"* | sort -nk 1 | tail -n $count | cut -f2 | xargs -I file du -shx file; }
2013-01-21 09:45:21
User: jhyland87
Functions: cut du echo file sort tail xargs
1

You can simply run "largest", and list the top 10 files/directories in ./, or you can pass two parameters, the first being the directory, the 2nd being the limit of files to display.

Best off putting this in your bashrc or bash_profile file

history | awk '{if ($2 == "sudo") a[$3]++; else a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print a[i] " " i}}' | sort -rn | head
2012-12-31 13:45:03
User: JamieKitson
Functions: awk sort
-1

List of commands you use most often suppressing sudo

history | awk '{if ($2 == "sudo") a[$3]++; else a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print a[i] " " i}}' | sort -rn | head
find . -type d | while read dir ; do num=`ls -l $dir | grep '^-' | wc -l` ; echo "$num $dir" ; done | sort -rnk1 | head
find . -type f -printf "%T@ %Tc %p\n" |sort -n |cut -d' ' -f2- |tail -n20
du . | sort -nr | awk '{split("KB MB GB TB", arr); idx=1; while ( $1 > 1024 ) { $1/=1024; idx++} printf "%10.2f",$1; print " " arr[idx] "\t" $2}' | head -25
2012-12-03 02:59:13
User: agas
Functions: awk du head printf sort
0

Lists the size in human readable form and lists the top 25 biggest directories/files

tail -1000 `ls -ltr /var/log/CF* |tail -1|awk '{print $9}'`|cut -d "," -f 17|sort|uniq -c |sort -k2
2012-11-30 16:30:41
User: raindylong
Functions: awk cut sort tail uniq
0

count & sort one field of the log files , such as nginx/apache access log files .

du -hd1 |sort -h
pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
2012-11-20 03:40:55
Functions: awk cut grep paste sort
0

This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed)