Commands by Kaio (4)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Get info on RAM Slots and Max RAM.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Displays the version of the Adobe Flash plugin installed
This is for Debian, simply change the path if your Flash plugin is installed elsewhere.

Insert commas to make reading numbers easier in the output of ls
This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, corey@cac.washington.edu, 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-)

find out how much space are occuipied by files smaller than 1024K (sic) - improved
The original didn't use -print0 which fails on weird file names eg with spaces. The original parsed the output of 'ls -l' which is always a bad idea.

change dinosaur poop into gold
if firefox is running the database is locked, so you need to copy the places.sqlite file temporarily somewhere to be able to query it...

Get HTTP status code with curl

Follow the most recently updated log files
This command finds the 5 (-n5) most frequently updated logs in /var/log, and then does a multifile tail follow of those log files. Alternately, you can do this to follow a specific list of log files: sudo tail -n0 -f /var/log/{messages,secure,cron,cups/error_log}

Upgrade all expired homebrew packages
You probably want to run `brew update` before you run this command

Have netcat listening on your ports and use telnet to test connection
This will start a netcat process listening on port 666. If you are able connect to your your server, netcat will receive the data being sent and spit it out to the screen (it may look like random garbage, so you might want to redirect it to a file).


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: