Commands by andrewtayloruk (3)

  • Use the AWS CLI tools to generate a list instances, then pipe them to JQ to show only their launch time and instance id. Finally use sort to bring them out in runtime order. Find all those instances you launched months ago and have forgotten about. Show Sample Output


    2
    aws ec2 describe-instances | jq '.["Reservations"]|.[]|.Instances|.[]|.LaunchTime + " " + .InstanceId' | sort -n
    andrewtayloruk · 2014-02-03 07:59:47 5
  • A quick find command to identify all TAR files in a given path, extract a list of files contained within the tar, then search for a given string in the filelist. Returns to the user as a list of TAR files found (enclosed in []) followed by any matching files that exist in that archive. TAR can easily be swapped for JAR if required. Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -type f -name "*.tar" -printf [%f]\\n -exec tar -tf {} \; | grep -iE "[\[]|<filename>"
    andrewtayloruk · 2011-01-06 13:01:38 0
  • Just a quick and simple one to demonstrate Bash For loop. Copies 'file' to multiple ssh hosts.


    7
    for h in host1 host2 host3 host4 ; { scp file user@$h:/destination_path/ ; }
    andrewtayloruk · 2009-02-16 01:02:35 1

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