Commands by andrewtayloruk (3)

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Remove spaces from filenames - through a whole directory tree.
An example of zsh glob qualifiers.

See udev at work
See how your system works with pendrives/mice/monitors/whatever-you-can-plug-in. Use cases: see on which /dev/... your peripherals are, find out if a specific udev rule is being applied correctly.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Check if it's your binary birthday!
Print out your age in days in binary. Today's my binary birthday, I'm 2^14 days old :-) . This command does bash arithmatic $(( )) on two dates: Today: $(date +%s) Date of birth: $(date +%s -d YYYY-MM-DD) The dates are expressed as the number of seconds since the Unix epoch (Jan 1970), so we devide the difference by 86400 (seconds per day). . Finally we pipe "obase=2; DAYS-OLD" into bc to convert to binary. (obase == output base)

Randomize lines (opposite of | sort)
Randomizes a file. The opposite of sort is sort -R!

Shows how many percents of all avaliable packages are installed in your gentoo system

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files
That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems. Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

Find today created files

randomize hostname and mac address, force dhcp renew. (for anonymous networking)
this string of commands will release your dhcp address, change your mac address, generate a new random hostname and then get a new dhcp lease.


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