Commands by i814u2 (1)

  • Removes directories which are less than 1028KB total. This works for systems where blank directories are 4KB. If a directory contains 1 MB (1024KB) or less, it will remove the directory using a path relative to the directory where the command was initially executed (safer than some other options I found). Adjust the 1028 value for your needs. It would be helpful to test the results before proceeding with the removal. Simply run all but the last two commands to see a list of what will be removed: du | awk '{if($1<1028)print;}' | cut -d $'\t' -f 2- If you're unsure what size a blank folder is, test it like this: mkdir test; du test; rmdir test


    0
    du | awk '{if($1<1028)print;}' | cut -d $'\t' -f 2- | tr "\n" "\0" | xargs -0 rm -rf
    i814u2 · 2015-06-25 16:00:48 0

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