Commands tagged cpan (3)

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Time Synchronisation with NTP

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Create a new file

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

bulk dl files based on a pattern
-O switch creates local filename same as remote curl [][] -o #1#2 makes local files unique inserting sequence values into #x placeholders sequences can be alpha or numeric e.g [a-z] [1-25]

vim read stdin

Converts all windows .URL shortcuts in a directory to linux (gnome) .desktop shortcuts

Set file access control lists
The file myfile is owned by tom and has read and write permissions for tom. Group and other permissions are empty which make myfile readable and writable only by tom. setfacl enables user tom to give read permission to user john only. The command 'ls -l' shows a '+' sign telling us that file access control list has been setup for myfile.

Marks all manually installed deb packages as automatically installed.
An alternative without aptitude.

Create backup copy of file, adding suffix of the date of the file modification (NOT today's date)
When I go to change a configuration file I always like to make a backup first. You can use "cp -p" to preserve the modification time, but it gets confusing to have file.prev, file.prev2, etc. So I like to add a YYMMDD suffix that shows when the file was last changed. "stat -c %Y" gives you the modification time in epoch seconds, then "date -d @" converts that to whatever format you specify in your "+format" string.


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