Commands tagged epub (6)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

removing syncronization problems between audio and video
This assumes that there is a 10.2 sec delay between the video and the audio (delayed). To extract the original video into a audio and video composites look at the command on extracting audio and video from a movie

Convert flv without re-encoding

Remove a range of lines from a file

find text in a file
this will find text in the directory you specify and give you line where it appears.

List out classes in of all htmls in directory
Lists out all classes used in all *.html files in the currect directory. usefull for checking if you have left out any style definitions, or accidentally given a different name than you intended. ( I have an ugly habit of accidentally substituting camelCase instead of using under_scores: i would name soemthing counterBox instead of counter_box) WARNING: assumes you give classnames in between double quotes, and that you apply only one class per element.

df without line wrap on long FS name
-P uses the POSIX output format, which makes information on each file system always printed on exactly one line. "column -t" makes a table from the input.

FizzBuzz in one line of Bash
The (in)famous "FizzBuzz" programming challenge, answered in a single line of Bash code. The "|column" part at the end merely formats the output a bit, so if "column" is not installed on your machine you can simply omit that part. Without "|column", the solution only uses 75 characters. The version below is expanded to multiple lines, with comments added. for i in {1..100} # Use i to loop from "1" to "100", inclusive. do ((i % 3)) && # If i is not divisible by 3... x= || # ...blank out x (yes, "x= " does that). Otherwise,... x=Fizz # ...set x to the string "Fizz". ((i % 5)) || # If i is not divisible by 5, skip (there's no "&&")... x+=Buzz # ...Otherwise, append (not set) the string "Buzz" to x. echo ${x:-$i} # Print x unless it is blanked out. Otherwise, print i. done | column # Wrap output into columns (not part of the test).

Print Memory Utilization Percentage For a specific process and it's children
Change the name of the process and what is echoed to suit your needs. The brackets around the h in the grep statement cause grep to skip over "grep httpd", it is the equivalent of grep -v grep although more elegant.


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