Commands tagged scan (9)


  • 13
    sudo arp-scan -I eth0 192.168.1.0/24
    sata · 2010-07-01 02:46:41 3
  • Simple one-liner for scanning a range of hosts, you can also scan a range of ports with Netcat by ex.: nc -v -n -z -w 1 192.168.0.1 21-443 Useful when Nmap is not available:) Range declaration like X..X "for i in {21..29}" is only works with bash 3.0+ Show Sample Output


    9
    for i in {21..29}; do nc -v -n -z -w 1 192.168.0.$i 443; done
    rez0r · 2009-09-25 03:31:29 3
  • nmap for windows and other platforms is available on developer's site: http://nmap.org/download.html nmap is robust tool with many options and has various output modes - is the best (imho) tool out there.. from nmap 5.21 man page: -oN/-oX/-oS/-oG : Output scan in normal, XML, s| Show Sample Output


    6
    nmap -v -sP 192.168.0.0/16 10.0.0.0/8
    anapsix · 2010-07-14 19:53:02 0
  • Joins two pdf documents coming from a simplex document feed scanner. Needs pdftk >1.44 w/ shuffle.


    5
    pdftk A=odd.pdf B=even.pdf shuffle A1-end Bend-1S output duplex.pdf
    till · 2011-02-25 15:00:09 2
  • Xsane produces PDFs that are too large - particularly multipage PDFs. This command compresses them. If you do not use A4, remove the -sPAPERSIZE flag.


    3
    gs -q -sPAPERSIZE=a4 -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -sOutputFile=test.pdf multipageproject.pdf
    iain · 2009-03-24 17:14:46 1
  • Adjust the --resolution and --mode as required (if these options are available for your scanner). The size options (-x, -y, -imageheight, -imagewidth) are for US letter paper. For A4, I think the command would be: scanimage -p --resolution 250 --mode Gray -x 210 -y 297 | pnmtops -imageheight 11.7 -imagewidth 8.3 | ps2pdf - output.pdf


    3
    scanimage -p --resolution 250 --mode Gray -x 215.9 -y 279.4 | pnmtops -imageheight 11 -imagewidth 8.5 | ps2pdf - output.pdf
    dbh · 2013-04-12 18:18:42 0

  • 1
    arp-scan -I eth0 -l | perl -ne '/((\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3})/ and $ip=$1 and $_=`nmblookup -A $ip` and /([[:alnum:]-]+)\s+<00>[^<]+<ACTIVE>/m and printf "%15s %s\n",$ip,$1'
    bandie91 · 2011-07-08 07:41:41 0
  • Check to see if a port is open or closed on a given host. Show Sample Output


    0
    checkport() { sudo nmap -sS -p $1 $2 }
    peterRepeater · 2011-12-13 11:46:15 1
  • documents all active ips on a subnet and saves to txt file. Show Sample Output


    -9
    FOR /L %i IN (1,1,254) DO ping -n 1 10.254.254.%i | FIND /i "Reply">> c:\ipaddresses.txt
    barrytrujillo · 2010-06-29 21:02:21 0

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ssh X tunneling over multiple ssh hosts (through ssh proxy)
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List all symbolic links in current directory
Tested with GNU and BSD ls.

View All Processess Cmdlines and Environments
Grabs the cmdline used to execute the process, and the environment that the process is being run under. This is much different than the 'env' command, which only lists the environment for the shell. This is very useful (to me at least) to debug various processes on my server. For example, this lets me see the environment that my apache, mysqld, bind, and other server processes have. Here's a function I use: $ aa_ps_all () { ( cd /proc && command ps -A -opid= | xargs -I'{}' sh -c 'test $PPID -ne {}&&test -r {}/cmdline&&echo -e "\n[{}]"&&tr -s "\000" " "

Connect via sftp to a specific port
I use this for connect via sftp to a server listening on a non default ssh port.

View Processeses like a fu, fu
I don't truly enjoy many commands more than this one, which I alias to be ps1.. Cool to be able to see the heirarchy and makes it clearer what need to be killed, and whats really going on.

run shell with your commandlinefu.com's favourites as bash_history
This makes your commandlinefu.com's favorites appear as most recent commands in your history.

Runs previous command replacing foo by bar every time that foo appears
Very useful for rerunning a long command changing some arguments globally. As opposed to ^foo^bar, which only replaces the first occurrence of foo, this one changes every occurrence.

floating point operations in shell scripts
-l auto-selects many more digits (but you can round/truncate in your head, right) plus it loads a few math functions like sin().

Alias TAIL for automatic smart output
Run the alias command, then issue $ps aux | tail and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand. $ ${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the default of 80. The default for TAIL is to output the last 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the last x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 7. The -7 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used TAIL, ie the prompt. Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html ) 275MB/748MB [7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~ $ In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device.

A DESTRUCTIVE command to render a drive unbootable
THIS COMMAND IS DESTRUCTIVE. That said, lets assume you want to render your boot drive unbootable and reboot your machine. Maybe you want it to boot off the network and kickstart from a boot server for a fresh OS install. Replace /dev/fd0 with the device name of your boot drive and this DESTRUCTIVE command will render your drive unbootable. Your BIOS boot priority should be set to boot from HD first, then LAN.


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