Commands tagged inode free (4)

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Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Stores the certificate expiration date on the variable A
Stores the certificate expiration date on the variable A

Alias for quick command-line volume set (works also remotely via SSH)
If you're addicted to command-line solutions of ordinary actions or if you just want to set your volume from bed via mobile phone SSH, you can set this alias and use it as $ setvol 50 for setting volume on 50% gain Works only with ALSA, tested on Ubuntu 8.10. Give me some info about your experience. TIP: Try aslo command "mute" to toggle mute/unmute sound. But I don't know if this works on all distros.

backup your history
simple and easy backup your history with timestamp

Perform a branching conditional
This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: $ ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands $ ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution

Convert filenames from ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8
Nothing advanced, it just finds filenames that are stored with ISO-8859-1 characters and and converts those into UTF-8. Recommended to use without the --notest flag first so you can see what will be changed.

Create a bunch of dummy files for testing
Sometimes I need to create a directory of files to operate on to test out some commandlinefu I am cooking up. The main thing is the range ({1..N}) expansion.

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

du with colored bar graph
i'm using gawk, you may get varying mileage with other varieties. You might want to change the / after du to say, /home/ or /var or something, otherwise this command might take quite some time to complete. Sorry it's so obsfucated, I had to turn a script into a one-liner under 255 characters for commandlinefu. Note: the bar ratio is relative, so the highest ratio of the total disk, "anchors" the rest of the graph. EDIT: the math was slightly wrong, fixed it. Also, made it compliant with older versions of df.

Pause Current Thread
Hold ctrl and press z to pause the current thread. Run $fg to resume it.


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