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Duplicating service runlevel configurations from one server to another.
And then to complete the task: Go to target host; $ssh host Turn everything off: $for i in `chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | awk '{print $1}'` ; do chkconfig --level 12345 $i off; done Create duplicate config: $while read line; do chkconfig --level $line on; done < foo

apt-get upgrade with bandwidth limit
in Debian-based systems apt-get could be limited to the specified bandwidth in kilobytes using the apt configuration options(man 5 apt.conf, man apt-get). I'd quote man 5 apt.conf: "The used bandwidth can be limited with Acquire::http::Dl-Limit which accepts integer values in kilobyte. The default value is 0 which deactivates the limit and tries uses as much as possible of the bandwidth..." "HTTPS URIs. Cache-control, Timeout, AllowRedirect, Dl-Limit and proxy options are the same as for http..."

Colorize matching string without skipping others
this is useful to highlight only some code without losing other lines (eg. software, logs, scripts)

Download Apple movie trailers
Copy the link to an HD movie trailer in to this command. It's more eleganant if it's put in a to a script, taking the URL as input.

trace the system calls made by a process (and its children)
strace can be invaluable in trying to figure out what the heck some misbehaving program is doing. There are number of useful flags to limit and control its output, and to attach to already running programs. (See also 'ltrace'.)

Multiple variable assignments from command output in BASH
No command substitution but subshell redirection

bash screensaver (scrolling ascii art with customizable message)
Displays a scrolling banner which loops until you hit Ctrl-C to terminate it. Make sure you finish your banner message with a space so it will loop nicely.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Update your journal
prerequisite: $ mkdir ~/journal

Securely destroy data (including whole hard disks)
GNU shred is provided by the coreutils package on most Linux distribution (meaning, you probably have it installed already), and is capable of wiping a device to DoD standards. You can give shred any file to destroy, be it your shell history or a block device file (/dev/hdX, for IDE hard drive X, for example). Shred will overwrite the target 25 times by default, but 3 is enough to prevent most recovery, and 7 passes is enough for the US Department of Defense. Use the -n flag to specify the number of passes, and man shred for even more secure erasing fun. Note that shredding your shell history may not be terribly effective on devices with journaling filesystems, RAID copies or snapshot copies, but if you're wiping a single disk, none of that is a concern. Also, it takes quite a while :)


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