Commands by Patola (5)

  • Found another way, more compatible. Tested with xterm, aterm, gnome-terminal and rxvt (where it sets the window title) and guake (where it doesn't - after all, guake does not show the window title).


    0
    [[ "x$TERM" == "xrxvt" || "x$XTERM_VERSION" == xXTerm* || "x$COLORTERM" == 'gnome-terminal' && "x$SHELL" == */bin/zsh ]] && preexec () { print -Pn "\e]0;$1\a" }
    Patola · 2009-10-05 15:39:45 2
  • Found the same command for zsh in http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html - changed it a bit so that the behaviour is the same


    1
    if [ "$SHELL" = '/bin/zsh' ]; then case $TERM in rxvt|*term|linux) preexec () { print -Pn "\e]0;$1\a" };; esac; fi
    Patola · 2009-10-05 15:21:42 2
  • This command changes all filename and directories within a directory tree to unaccented ones. I had to do this to 'sanitize' some samba-exported trees. The reason it works might seem a little difficult to see at first - it first reverses-sort by pathname length, then it renames only the basename of the path. This way it'll always go in the right order to rename everything. Some notes: 1. You'll have to have the 'unaccent' command. On Ubuntu, just aptitude install unaccent. 2. In this case, the encoding of the tree was UTF-8 - but you might be using another one, just adjust the command to your encoding. 3. The program might spit a few harmless errors saying the files are the same - not to fear.


    2
    find /dir | awk '{print length, $0}' | sort -nr | sed 's/^[[:digit:]]* //' | while read dirfile; do outfile="$(echo "$(basename "$dirfile")" | unaccent UTF-8)"; mv "$dirfile" "$(dirname "$dirfile")/$outfile"; done
    Patola · 2009-08-24 21:24:18 5
  • This command starts screen with 'htop', 'nethogs' and 'iotop' in split-screen. You have to have these three commands (of course) and specify the interface for nethogs - mine is wlan0, I could have acquired the interface from the default route extending the command but this way is simpler. htop is a wonderful top replacement with many interactive commands and configuration options. nethogs is a program which tells which processes are using the most bandwidth. iotop tells which processes are using the most I/O. The command creates a temporary "screenrc" file which it uses for doing the triple-monitoring. You can see several examples of screenrc files here: http://www.softpanorama.org/Utilities/Screen/screenrc_examples.shtml


    18
    tmpfile=$(mktemp) && echo -e 'startup_message off\nscreen -t top htop\nsplit\nfocus\nscreen -t nethogs nethogs wlan0\nsplit\nfocus\nscreen -t iotop iotop' > $tmpfile && sudo screen -c $tmpfile
    Patola · 2009-08-03 10:14:02 7
  • It's the same command as submitted, but first with a command to make all characters green. It's the only way it looked "matrix-like" on my gnome-terminal.


    2
    echo -e "\e[31m"; while $t; do for i in `seq 1 30`;do r="$[($RANDOM % 2)]";h="$[($RANDOM % 4)]";if [ $h -eq 1 ]; then v="\e[1m $r";else v="\e[2m $r";fi;v2="$v2 $v";done;echo -e $v2;v2="";done;
    Patola · 2009-07-10 04:20:43 5

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