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Commands using cat from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using cat - 434 results
cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh <REMOTE> "(cat > tmp.pubkey ; mkdir -p .ssh ; touch .ssh/authorized_keys ; sed -i.bak -e '/$(awk '{print $NF}' ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub)/d' .ssh/authorized_keys; cat tmp.pubkey >> .ssh/authorized_keys; rm tmp.pubkey)"
2011-09-30 07:39:24
User: tamouse
Functions: cat ssh
Tags: ssh awk
4

This one is a bit more robust -- the remote machine may not have an .ssh directory, and it may not have an authorized_keys file, but if it does already, and you want to replace your ssh public key for some reason, this will work in that case as well, without duplicating the entry.

cat /dev/scd0 > ~/audio_image.iso
2011-09-24 15:29:27
User: eastwind
Functions: cat
-8

you should umount /dev/cdrom before using this cli

cat file.orig | ssh user1@host1 "ssh user2@host2 \"ssh user3@server3 'cat >file.dest'\""
2011-09-23 12:49:19
User: Cell
Functions: cat ssh
0

pub key in ./ssh/authorized_keys needed because ssh-ed ssh can't ask for the password.

cat file.txt | sendmail -F myname -f admin@mysite.com guest@guest.com
while :; do cat file.txt | nc -l 80; done
cat x
cat /proc/PID/environ | tr '\0' '\n'
cat aaaaaa 2>&-
cat -n file.txt
cat file.csv | perl -pe 'if($. == 1) {@h = split(/;/); $i = 1 ; map { $_ = $i; $i++ } @h; print join(" ;", @h) , "\n"} ; s/(^|;);/$1 ;/g' | column -ts\; | less -S
echo $(cat /usr/share/dict/words |grep -v "'"|shuf -n4)
2011-08-31 12:48:14
User: d1v3rdown
Functions: cat echo grep
Tags: cat echo grep shuf
0

Fast and excludes words with apostrophes. For ubuntu, you can use wamerican or wbritish dictionaries, installable through aptitude.

cat /etc/passwd | column -nts:
mkdir replaced;for i in *; do cat "$i"| sed 's/foo/bar/' > "replaced/$i"; done
2011-08-30 08:28:26
User: rubo77
Functions: cat mkdir sed
-5

if you want to replace "foo" with "bar" in all files in a folder, and put the resulting files into a new subfolder

cat dirtyfile.txt | awk '{gsub(/[[:punct:]]/,"")}1' | tr A-Z a-z | sed 's/[0-9]*//g' | sed -e 's/ //g' | strings | tr -cs '[:alpha:]' '\ ' | sed -e 's/ /\n/g' | tr A-Z a-z | sort -u > cleanfile.txt
2011-08-28 01:26:04
User: purehate
Functions: awk cat sed sort strings tr
0

Using large wordlists is cumbersome. Using password cracking programs with rules such as Hashcat or John the ripper is much more effective. In order to do this many times we need to "clean" a wordlist removing all numbers, special characters, spaces, whitespace and other garbage. This command will covert a entire wordlist to all lowercase with no garbage.

x=(*.001); cat "${x%.001}."* > "${x%.001}" #unsafe; does not check that all the parts are there, or that the file-sizes make sense!
2011-08-24 04:10:20
User: Jessehz
Functions: cat make
0

Join all sequentially named files in the directory.

Use this for files split by utilities like hjsplit and similar.

This command does not do/perform _any_ sanity checks before acting, except that it won't run unless there is a file that matches "*.001".

- The outfile should not already exist.

- There should be more than one file. (*.002 should exist as well as *.001)

- The file-count should match the number in the name of the last file in the series.

- None of the files should be empty.

- All files should be the same size, except for the last, which should usually be smaller, but never larger than the rest.

A safer altenative can be found here: http://pastebin.com/KSS0zU2F

cat /usr/share/dict/words | grep -P ^[a-z].* | grep -v "'s$" | grep -Pv ^.\{1,15\}$ | shuf -n4 | tr '\n' ' ' | sed 's/$/\n/'
2011-08-15 01:03:48
User: bugmenot
Functions: cat grep sed tr
Tags: tr xkcd shuf
-2

The first grep rejects capitalised words since the dict has proper nouns in it that you mightn't want to use. The second grep rejects words with ending in apostrophe s, and the third forces the words to be at least 15 characters long.

cat input.txt | sed 's/\\\033[^a-zA-Z]*.//g'
cat subtitles.txt | perl -pe 's/} /}/g; s/{(\d+)}/=1=/; $f1=(24/25*$1); s/{(\d+)}/=2=/; $f2=(24/25*$1); $f1=~s/\..*//; $f2=~s/\..*//; s/=1=/{$f1}/; s/=2=/{$f2}/; ' > subtitles_newfps.txt
2011-07-30 15:34:43
User: ciekawy
Functions: cat perl
1

this command example converts to 25 fps subtitles that were originally created for 24 fps movie

find src/ -name "*.java" | while read f; do echo -n "$f "; cat "$f" | tr -dc '{}'; echo; done | awk '{ print length($2), $1 }' | sort -n
pdftk input1.pdf input2.pdf cat output output.pdf
MAC=$((date +'%Y%m%d%H%M%S%N'; cat /proc/interrupts) | md5sum | sed -r 's/(..)/\1:/g' | cut -d: -f 1-6)
2011-07-14 13:11:50
User: jazznjam
Functions: cat cut date md5sum sed
-1

I liked vaporub's suggestion, here a little simplification of the sed command.

cat video.avi.001 video.avi.002 video.avi.003 >> video.avi
cat my.sandbox.cnf | awk -F "=" 'NF < 2 {print} sub("=", "=~placeholder~=") {print}' | awk -F "=~placeholder~=" 'NF < 2 {gsub("-", "_", $0); print} NF==2 {gsub("-", "_", $1); print $1 "=" $2}'
2011-07-06 09:35:55
User: ShlomiNoach
Functions: awk cat
0

Multi-word parameters in my.cnf can be written with either hyphens or underscores. innodb_file_per_table is the same as innodb-file-per-table, as well as innodb_file-per_table. The script normalizes the parameter names to using underscores only, keeping from changing values (e.g. ?mysql-bin? parameter value should not change).

cat my.cnf | sed '/^#/d' | sed '/^$/d' | sed -e 's/[ \t]\+//g'
cat /etc/issue
2011-06-22 15:04:45
User: h3nr1x
Functions: cat
1

Another way of do it in debian like distros, don't know if works for others