Commands by HerbCSO (2)

  • Goes through all files in the directory specified, uses `stat` to print out last modification time, then sorts numerically in reverse, then uses cut to remove the modified epoch timestamp and finally head to only output the last 10 modified files. Note that on a Mac `stat` won't work like this, you'll need to use either: find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -f '%m%t%Sm %12z %N' | sort -nr | cut -f2- | head or alternatively do a `brew install coreutils` and then replace `stat` with `gstat` in the original command. Show Sample Output


    5
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -c'%Y :%y %12s %n' | sort -nr | cut -d: -f2- | head
    HerbCSO · 2013-08-03 09:53:46 2
  • For each directory from the current one, list the counts of files in each of these directories. Change the -maxdepth to drill down further through directories. Show Sample Output


    2
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec sh -c "printf '{} ' ; find '{}' -type f -ls | wc -l" \;
    HerbCSO · 2013-07-29 19:46:35 0

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