Commands by P17 (19)

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SMTP Analysis
This works just as well for SMTP. You could run this on your mail server to watch e-mail senders and recipients: tcpdump -l -s0 -w - tcp dst port 25 | strings | grep -i 'MAIL FROM\|RCPT TO'

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

GZip all files in a directory separately

Simulate typing but with mistakes
The output will show jerk, then wonderful person since echo parses the \b character.

execute a shell with netcat without -e
how to execute a shell on a server with a netcat binary which doesn't support -e option

Remove Backup Files
Remove all text backup files.

Display kernel profile of currently executing functions in Solaris.
Lockstat will sample the kernel 977 times per second, and print out the functions that it sees executing on the CPU during the sample. The -s 10 switch tells lockstsat to not only print that function, but also show the call stack (up to 10 deep).

rsync instead of scp
The command copies a file from remote SSH host on port 8322 with bandwidth limit 100KB/sec; --progress shows a progress bar --partial turns partial download on; thus, you can resume the process if something goes wrong --bwlimit limits bandwidth by specified KB/sec --ipv4 selects IPv4 as preferred I find it useful to create the following alias: alias myscp='rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4' in ~/.bash_aliases, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc where appropriate.

Copy one file to multiple files
Copies file.org to file.copy1 ... file.copyn

Update a tarball
This will update the tarball, adding files that have changed since the last update. This assumes that the tarball is in the same directory as the files being archived. N.B. This command can't be used on compressed tarballs. N.B. This will add the updated files to the tarball, so that the tarball will have two versions of each file. This will make the tarball larger, but doesn't have any other significant effect.


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