Commands by kostis (3)

  • As an alternative to the above command, this one ditches the unnecessary and complicated for loop in favor of a way faster multi-core approach for a task that's more CPU than I/O intensive, making it a perfect suite for GNU parallel


    4
    parallel cwebp -q 80 {} -o {.}.webp ::: *.png
    kostis · 2018-12-07 23:37:24 1
  • You could have that little benchmark run on all cores in parallel, as a multi-core benchmark or stress test First find the number of cores, then have parallel iterate over that in, well, parallel Show Sample Output


    -1
    time cat /proc/cpuinfo |grep proc|wc -l|xargs seq|parallel -N 0 echo "2^2^20" '|' bc
    kostis · 2018-12-06 05:36:55 0
  • Broken in two parts, first get the number of cores with cat /proc/cpuinfo |grep proc|wc -l and create a integer sequence with that number (xargs seq), then have GNU parallel loop that many times over the given command. Cheers! Show Sample Output


    -2
    time cat /proc/cpuinfo |grep proc|wc -l|xargs seq|parallel -N 0 echo "scale=4000\; a\(1\)\*4" '|' bc -l
    kostis · 2018-12-06 05:15:24 2

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