Commands by rubo77 (8)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

View all date formats, Quick Reference Help Alias
If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com $ ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' $ # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory $ tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g'

find files in a date range
Find files in a specific date range - in this case, the first half of last year. -newermt = modification time of the file is more recent than this date GNU find allows any date specfication that GNU date would accept, e.g. $ find . -type f -newermt "3 years ago" ! -newermt "2 years ago" or $ find . -type f -newermt "last monday"

Deleting / Ignoring lines from the top of a file
Output lines starting at line 2.

Record camera's output to a avi file
video.avi is the resulting file. Press Ctrl+c to stop the recording. You can change the OVC option to another to record into a different format.

rsync directory tree including only files that match a certain find result.
'-mtime -10' syncs only files newer 10 days (-mtime is just one example, use whatever find expressions you need) printf %P: File's name with the name of the command line argument under which it was found removed. this way, you can use any src directory, no need to cd into your src directory first. using \\0 in printf and a corresponding --from0 in rsync ensures that even filenames with newline characters work (thanks syssyphus for #3808). both, #1481 and #3808 just work if you either copy the current directory (.) , or the filesystem root (/), otherwise the output from find and the source dir from rsync just don't match. #7685 works with an arbitrary source directory.

Monitor dynamic changes in the dmesg log.
Other logs can be monitored similarly, e.g. $ watch "tail -15 /var/log/daemon.log"

Robust expansion (i.e. crash) of bash variables with a typo
By default bash expands an unbound variable to an empty string. This can be dangerous, if a critical variable name (a path prefix for example) has a typo. The -u option causes bash to treat this as an error, and the -e option causes it to exit in case of an error. These two together will make your scripts a lot safer against typos. The default behaviour can be explicitly requested using the ${NAME:-} syntax. A (less explicit) variation: #!/bin/bash -eu

Easily decode unix-time (funtion)

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

watch process stack, sampled at 1s intervals
This command repeatedly gets the specified process' stack using pstack (which is an insanely clever and tiny wrapper for gdb) and displays it fullscreen. Since it updates every second, you rapidly get an idea of where your program is stuck or spending time. The 'tac' is used to make the output grow down, which makes it less jumpy. If the output is too big for your screen, you can always leave the 'tac' off to see the inner calls. (Or, better yet--get a bigger screen.) Caveats: Won't work with stripped binaries and probably not well with threads, but you don't want to strip your binaries or use threads anyway.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: