Commands by tboulay (1)

  • This is just a little snippit to split a large file into smaller chunks (4mb in this example) and then send the chunks off to (e)mail for archival using mutt. I usually encrypt the file before splitting it using openssl: openssl des3 -salt -k <password> -in file.tgz -out file.tgz.des3 To restore, simply save attachments and rejoin them using: cat file.tgz.* > output_name.tgz and if encrypted, decrypt using: openssl des3 -d -salt -k <password> -in file.tgz.des3 -out file.tgz edit: (changed "g" to "e" for political correctness)


    -1
    split -b4m file.tgz file.tgz. ; for i in file.tgz.*; do SUBJ="Backup Archive"; MSG="Archive File Attached"; echo $MSG | mutt -a $i -s $SUBJ YourEmail@(E)mail.com
    tboulay · 2010-03-20 16:49:19 4

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