Commands by verboEse (3)

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Download Entire YouTube Channel - all of a user's videos
create the function then run 'yt-chanrip username' to download that user's entire channel. uses youtube-dl and the GData API. similar to http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3154/download-youtube-playlist

Buffer in order to avoir mistakes with redirections that empty your files
A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...

The wisdom of Cave Johnson
There's been a similar Futurama thing around for a while, which grabs a quote from the /. headers [curl -Ism3 slashdot.org | egrep "^X-(F|B|L)" | cut -d \- -f 2- | fmt -w $(tput cols)]. Same deal, but more likely to stop working when someone forgets to pay the bill on the domain. Until then: Cave Johnson!

Monitor connection statistics with netstat and watch

exim statistics about mails from queue
statistics are sorted based on number of recipients.

happened to find this not bad software to keep my files and folders safe! Even the free trial version has the fantastic functions to protect any private files from being seen by anyone except me. With it I can encrypt, hide or lock anything I want, amazin
I noticed some spammer posted an advertisement here for "not bad" encryption. Unfortunately, their software only runs under Microsoft Windows and fails to work from the commandline. My shell script improves upon those two aspects, with no loss in security, using the exact same "military-grade" encryption technology, which has the ultra-cool codename "ROT-13". For extra security, I recommend running ROT-13 twice.

Perform Real-time Process Monitoring Using Watch Utility

Show the total number of changes that every user committed to a Subversion repository
This saves Subversion's log output as XML and then runs an XQuery over it. This is standard XQuery 1.0 and should therefore also work with other XQuery processors. I have tested it with Zorba (http://www.zorba-xquery.com). XQilla (http://xqilla.sourceforge.net) also does it, but you'd have to save the query to a file and then execute "xqilla filename.xq". The query first finds all distinct authors and then, for each author, sums up the number of paths they have changed in each commit. This accounts for commits of multiple changes at once. The indenting space in all lines from the second one seems to be due to a bug in Zorba.

Scan Subnet for IP and MAC addresses

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
* to get the English dictionary: wget http://www.mavi1.org/web_security/wordlists/webster-dictionary.txt


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