Commands tagged change (6)

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Find the package that installed a command
Put this one-line function somewhere in your shell init, re-login and try $ whatinstalled This is an elaborate wrapper around "dpkg -S", with numerous safeguards. Symlinks and command aliases are resolved. If the searched command is not an existing executable file or was installed by some other means than dpkg/apt, nothing is printed to stdout, otherwise the package name.

Find unused IPs on a given subnet
Somewhat shorter version.

Check motherboard manufacturer, product name, version and serial number
Very slick way to check your motherboard manufacturer, product name, version and serial number.

get useful statistics from tcpdump (sort by ip)
We can get useful statistics from tcpdump with this simple command. Thanks "Babak Farrokhi" to teaching me this ;)

List all files ever added in git repository

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

cleanup /tmp directory
Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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