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Terminal - All commands - 11,925 results
ssh -l <username> <server>
while [ 1 ]; do echo -e "220 ProFTPD 1.3.3c Server [ProFTPD] \nFAILED FTP ATTEMPT - PORT 21" | nc -vvv -l 192.168.1.65 21 >> /var/log/honeylog.log 2>> /var/log/honeylog.log; done
2013-07-16 19:05:37
User: xmuda
Functions: echo
-1

[root@dhcppc1 windows]# cat /var/log/honeylog.log

Connection from 192.168.1.71 port 21 [tcp/ftp] accepted

Connection from 192.168.1.65 port 21 [tcp/ftp] accepted

[root@dhcppc1 windows]# nc 192.168.1.65 21

220 ProFTPD 1.3.3c Server [ProFTPD]

FAILED FTP ATTEMPT - PORT 21

*You can not run it if you have activated the ftp server.

cleartool co -nc `cleartool ls -recurse | grep "hijacked" | sed s/\@\@.*// | xargs`
curl http://www.spam.la/?f=sender | grep secs| awk '{print; exit}' | osd_cat -i 40 -d 30 -l 2
2009-11-12 21:33:06
User: m33600
Functions: awk grep
-1

I have a custmer's Geovision DVR installed on a closed proxi (only logme-in reaches it).

I have to check for reliability but logmein hangs and is too slow a process

I made the Geovision software send e-mail every minute to the www.spam.la site.

All this script does is to retrieve the e-mail header from spam.la ( no login!), filtering sender, stopping at the first occurrence of the word "secs" ( the age of the last e-mail ).

The result is the age of the sender's last e-mail, tiny published on top of my screen once a minute.

I can refresh www.spam.la via web browser, but have other things to do.

I use it inside Kalarm ( kde task schedule ) set to 1 minute repeat.

It can be done without kalarm, using Watch outside the script.

Try it out now using my account = geo1 ( change sender by geo1 in this script)

Needs curl , osd-bin

echo $?
2011-07-27 15:34:20
User: lucasrangit
Functions: echo
-1

I often find it useful to know what the exit status for a program was. This can be helpful when looking up errors by exit status or when scripting frequent commands.

Taken from http://www.faqs.org/docs/abs/HTML/exit-status.html

zenity --list --width 500 --height 500 --column 'Wallpapers' $(ls) | xargs xsetbg -center -smooth -fullscreen
2011-11-15 02:44:48
User: TheShadowFog
Functions: xargs
-1

Assuming you have zenity installed, and assuming that you keep your backgrounds in ~/backgrounds, then this should work for you! :)

find . -maxdepth 2 -type d -name '.git' -print0 | while read -d ''; do (cd "$REPLY"; git gc); done
2012-11-07 08:38:33
User: unhammer
Functions: cd find read
Tags: git drivespace
-1

Assumes you've cd'd to the folder in which all your git repos reside; you could run it from ~ without -maxdepth, although that might make find take quite a while longer.

If you have several processor cores, but not that much ram, you might want to run

git config --global pack.threads 1

first, since gc-ing can eat lots of ram.

ct mkelem -nc `find ./ -name "*" | xargs`
export PS1="C:\\>"; clear
2011-06-18 17:52:42
User: ThePCKid
Functions: export
-1

Is there somebody that uses Windows a lot that keeps messing up your Linux machine? Press Ctrl+Alt+F1-F6 and run this command after logging into a text shell!

hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') R=$(printf '\033[0m'); sed -e "s/\t/${C}&#9657;&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}&#8267;$R/";}
2012-11-07 09:55:48
User: unhammer
Functions: printf sed
-1

I don't think it's possible to give a (background) colour to the tab itself, since a tab is, IIUC, simply a command to the terminal to move to the right. Nevertheless, this "highlighting" can be helpful when working with tab-separated files.

dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | sort | uniq | xargs -n 3 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
2014-03-20 06:27:15
User: Sepero
Functions: dmesg find grep sort uniq xargs
Tags: find inode btrfs
-1

Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes.

gst-launch v4l2src ! aasink
2009-02-18 22:17:53
User: rubenrua
-1

Use gstreamer to capture v4l2:///dev/video0 and show ascii art video in display.

find | egrep "\.(ade|adp|bat|chm|cmd|com|cpl|dll|exe|hta|ins|isp|jse|lib|mde|msc|msp|mst|pif|scr|sct|shb|sys|vb|vbe|vbs|vxd|wsc|wsf|wsh)$"
2010-11-23 16:53:55
User: poulter7
Functions: egrep find
-1

Returns any file in the folder which would be rejected by Gmail, if you were to send zipped version.

(Yes, you could just zip it and knock the extension off and put it back on the other side, but for some people this just isn't a solution)

echo -e "Berlin Date/Time is" `TZ=GMT-2 /bin/date \+%c`
hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') B=$(printf '\033[0;46m') R=$(printf '\033[0m') np=$(env printf "\u00A0\uFEFF"); sed -e "s/\t/${C}&#9657;&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}&#8267;$R/" -e "s/[$np]/${B}& $R/g";}
2012-11-07 10:09:40
User: unhammer
Functions: env printf sed
-1

Can't see it here, but the non-breaking space is highlighted :)

Of course,

cat -t -e

achieves something similar, but less colourful.

Could add more code points from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_%28punctuation%29#Spaces_in_Unicode

perl -i -ne 'print uc $_' $1
find * ! -name abc | xargs rm
cat $HISTFILE | grep command
find -type f -exec ffmpeg -i "{}" "{}".mp3 \;
svcadm disable cde-login
lpr file
2011-05-05 21:44:43
User: hutch
Functions: lpr
-1

Saves you an

open file

and CTRL+P

So simple and time-saving.

svn merge -r 1337:1336 PATH PATH
2009-02-06 00:48:17
User: troelskn
Functions: merge
-1

Reverts the changes that were made in a particular revision, in the local working copy. You must commit the local copy to the repository to make it permanent.

This is very useful for undoing a change.

You can revert multiple changes by specifying numbers wider apart; Just remember to put the highest number first.

S='<iframe src=\"http:\/\/254.254.254.254\/bad\/index.php\" width=\"1\" height=\"1\" frameborder=\"0\"><\/iframe>' && R=''; find . -name "*.html" -exec grep -l "$S" {} \; | xargs sed -i -e "s/$S/$R/g"
2010-04-12 21:45:16
User: rexington
Functions: find grep sed xargs
-1

Removes the given string from all files under the given path - in this case the path given is "." This demonstrates the characters that must be escaped for the grep and sed commands to do their work correctly. Very handy for fixing hacked html files.

find ./ -type f -mtime -1 -name .*.sw[po] -print | sed -r 's/^(.+)\/\.(\S+)\.sw[op]$/\1\/\2/' | xargs vim -r
2010-06-16 13:15:10
User: nodnarb
Functions: find sed vim xargs
-1

this is great if you loose you ssh connection (with out a screen session) or are working on a laptop with a bad battery, or just a power outage.

Modifications: you may not need the -print; the mtime is last modified time in days

rm $( ls | egrep -v 'abc|\s' )
2010-07-18 10:59:15
User: dbbolton
Functions: egrep ls rm
Tags: grep rm
-1

Really, you deserve whatever happens if you have a whitespace character in a file name, but this has a small safety net. The truly paranoid will use '-i'.