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Terminal - All commands - 11,930 results
kill -9 $(pidof *program*)
crontab -l | sed -e '$G;$s-$-'"$CRON_MINS $CRON_HOUR"' * * * /usr/bin/command >/dev/null 2>&1-' | crontab -
2010-01-07 11:00:05
User: JohnGH
Functions: crontab sed
-1

I needed to add a line to my crontab from within a script and didn't want to have to write my own temporary file.

You may find you need to reload the crond after this to make the change take effect.

e.g.:

if [ -x /sbin/service ]

then

/sbin/service crond reload

else

CRON_PID=`ps -furoot | awk '/[^a-z]cron(d)?$/{print $2}'`

if [ -n "$CRON_PID" ]

then

kill -HUP $CRON_PID

fi

fi

The reason I had CRON_HOUR and CRON_MINS instead of numbers is that I wanted to generate a random time between midnight & 6AM to run the job, which I did with:

CRON_HOUR=`/usr/bin/perl -e 'printf "%02d\n", int(rand(6))'` CRON_MINS=`/usr/bin/perl -e 'printf "%02d\n", int(rand(60));'`
convert input.png -pointsize 32 -gravity center -annotate 45 "hello, world" output.png
find $(locate hello) -type f -executable -print|grep -E "hello\$"
2012-08-18 07:51:53
Functions: find grep locate
-1

This command allow you quick find any executable by keyword(s) in your system.

NOTE: Sometime this command will output like this:

`hello.py.launch': No such file or directory

this is normal behaviour

find -type f -printf '%P\000' | egrep -iz '\.(avi|mpg|mov|flv|wmv|asf|mpeg|m4v|divx|mp4|mkv)$' | sort -z | xargs -0 ls -1
/sbin/ifconfig | grep inet | cut -f 2 -d ":" | cut -f 1 -d " " |egrep -v "^$"
for i in `seq 254`;do ping -c 1 192.168.10.$i > /dev/null && echo "$i is up"||echo "$i is down";done
cls && ipconfig | findstr -R "[ IPv4 | adapter ]"
mdfind "tag:data" > /tmp/data.txt ; zip -r9@ ~/Desktop/data.zip < /tmp/data.txt
2009-02-24 14:49:50
User: vranx
Tags: Os X
-1

finding all files with the metadata tag "data" using the metadata find command mdfind , writing the list to a temporary file, reading the input for the .zip file from this temporary file.

echo $X | egrep "^[0-9]+$"
find . -iname \*.[ch] -exec indent "{}" \;
2010-09-10 13:25:10
User: putnamhill
Functions: find
-1

This version uses the indent C formatting utility. Doesn't appear to be included with ubuntu. But CentOS and MacOS have it.

flipf(){ if [ -f "$1" -a -f "$2" ]; then mv "$1" "$1.$$" && mv "$2" "$1" && mv "$1.$$" "$2" || echo "$!"; else echo "Missing a file: $!"; fi; }
for file in "* *"; do mv "${file}" "${file// /_}"; done
ls /var/log/sa/sa[0-9]*|xargs -I '{}' sar -u -f {}|awk '/^[0-9]/&&!/^12:00:01|RESTART|CPU/{print "%user: "$4" %system: "$6" %iowait: "$7" %nice: "$5" %idle: "$9}'|sort -nk10|head
cls && ipconfig | findstr -R "[ IPv4 | adapter ]"
egrep -ie "<*HREF=(.*?)>" index.html | awk -F\" '{print $2}' | grep ://
caff <keyid>
2009-02-18 14:09:03
User: raphink
Tags: GPG
-1

Requires: signing-party (on Debian).

Note: you need a working MTA on your machine.

curl queip.tk/ip
alias :q='tput setaf 1; echo >&2 "this is NOT vi(m) :/"; tput sgr0'
2009-12-08 12:59:44
User: sputnick
Functions: alias echo tput
Tags: vim alias vi tput
-1

For vi(m) users :

Add it in your ~/.bashrc

Add an "exit" @ the end if you are masochist ;)

tune2fs -l /dev/XXXX | grep -w ^"Block size:"
2011-02-10 16:39:14
User: ncaio
Functions: grep tune2fs
-1

the result of the command helped a check the Maximum file size and Maximum file system size.

EXT3 Exemple:

Block size; MAX File size; Maximum file system size

1 KiB; 16 GiB ; 2 TiB

2 KiB ; 256 GiB ; 8 TiB

4 KiB ; 2 TiB ; 16 TiB

8 KiB[limits 1]; 2 TiB; 32 TiB

for i in $(wget -O- -U "" "http://wallbase.cc/random/23/e..." --quiet|grep wallpaper/|grep -oe 'http://wallbase.cc[^"]*'); do wget $(wget -O- -U "" $i --quiet|grep -oe 'http://[^"]*\.jpg');done
watch -n -0.1 fbcmd stream timeline
2013-04-20 17:36:18
User: hako
Functions: watch
-1

Streams your timeline on the commandline, required fbcmd

https://github.com/dtompkins/fbcmd

function ends_in_y() { case $(date +%A) in *y ) true ;; * ) false ;; esac } ; ends_in_y && echo ok
2010-04-06 22:18:52
Functions: date echo false true
-1

The shell has perfectly adequate pattern matching for simple expressions.

VARNAMES='ID FORENAME LASTNAME ADDRESS CITY PHONE MOBILE MAIL' ; cat customer.csv | while read LINE ; do COUNT=1 ; for VAR in $VARNAMES ; do eval "${VAR}=`echo $LINE | /usr/bin/awk {'print $'$COUNT''}`" ; let COUNT=COUNT+1 ; done ; done
2009-05-19 11:23:00
User: GeckoDH
Functions: cat eval read
-1

VARNAMES='ID FORENAME LASTNAME ADDRESS CITY PHONE MOBILE MAIL ...'

cat customer.csv | while read LINE ; do

COUNT=1

for VAR in $VARNAMES ; do

eval "${VAR}=`echo $LINE | /usr/bin/awk {'print $'$COUNT''}`"

let COUNT=COUNT+1

done

done

Maybe you have a CSV-File with addresses, where you have to process each contact (one per line, write each value to own variable). Of course you can define every variable, but this way is more simple and faster (to write).

VARNAMES includes the variable names. Pay attention: the number of names in VARNAMES have to be the same than in the CSV-file the fields. If the CSV is not seperated with ";", you can set the seperator after the awk-binary with -F"_" for example.

svn co http://simile.mit.edu/repository/crowbar/trunk&& cd ./trunk/xulapp/ xulrunner --install-app && Xvfb :1 && DISPLAY=:1 xulrunner application.ini 2>/dev/null 1>/dev/null && wget -O- "127.0.0.1:10000/&url=http://www.facebook.com"
2010-10-16 05:12:11
User: argv
Functions: cd wget
-1

some other options:

&delay=1000

&mode=links

much more with piggybank as scraper

works well with your favourite curses or non-curses http clients