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Commands tagged Date manipulation from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged Date manipulation - 19 results
desiredDay=6; year=2012; month=5; n=0; while [ $(date -d "$year-$((month+1))-1 - $n day" "+%u") -ne $desiredDay ]; do n=$((n+1)); done; date -d "$year-$((month+1))-1 - $n day" "+%x"
2012-05-17 12:02:30
Functions: date
0

Choosing your year and month. You only need the gnu date command and bash. desiredDay of the week is (1..7); 1 is Monday.

If you want desiredDay of week (0..6); 0 is Sunday

desiredDay=6; year=2012; month=5; n=0; while [ $(date -d "$year-$((month+1))-1 - $n day" "+%w") -ne $desiredDay ]; do n=$((n+1)); done; date -d "$year-$((month+1))-1 - $n day" "+%x"
cal 04 2012 | awk '{ $7 && X=$7 } END { print X }'
2012-05-06 23:43:21
User: flatcap
Functions: awk cal
2

If your locale has Monday as the first day of the week, like mine in the UK, change the two $7 into $6

cal 04 2012 | awk 'NF <= 7 { print $7 }' | grep -v "^$" | tail -1
2012-05-03 16:57:45
User: javidjamae
Functions: awk cal grep tail
-2

This is a little trickier than finding the last Sunday, because you know the last Sunday is in the first position of the last line. The trick is to use the NF less than or equal to 7 so it picks up all the lines then grep out any empty lines.

awk '{cmd="date --date=\""$1"\" +\"%Y/%m/%d %H:%M:%S\" "; cmd | getline convdate; print cmd";"convdate }' file.txt
2012-02-28 14:08:52
User: EBAH
Functions: awk
0

Convert readable date/time with `date` command

perl -le 'print scalar gmtime shift' 1234567890
echo -e "Berlin Date/Time is" `TZ=GMT-2 /bin/date \+%c`
if [ $(date +%u) -lt 6 ];then AT="tomorrow"; else AT="next monday";fi;echo "beep" | at ${AT}
2011-06-01 14:15:11
User: eduo
Functions: at date echo
1

Line can be modified as needed. This considers weekdays to be Mon-Fri. If run any working day it'll provide a parameters for the next working day for "at".

"beep" provided as a sample command.

This can be modified easily to include wait time. If you need something to run "D" days after today:

# D=4;if [ $(date +%u --date="${D} days") -lt 5 ];then AT="+${D} days";else AT="next monday";fi; echo "beep" | at noon ${AT}

date MMDDhhmmYYYY
2010-05-29 08:26:13
User: christian773
Functions: date
-1

date MMDDhhmmYYYY

date MMDDhhmm

# example 27.12.1975 08:00

date 122708001975

utime(){ python -c "import time; print(time.strftime('%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y', time.localtime($1)))"; }
utime(){ awk -v d=$1 'BEGIN{print strftime("%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", d)}'; }
utime(){ date -d "1970-01-01 GMT $1 seconds"; }
utime { date -d @$1; }
2010-05-12 12:21:15
User: deltaray
Functions: date
4

More recent versions of the date command finally have the ability to decode the unix epoch time into a human readable date. This function makes it simple to utilize this feature quickly.

date -j -v1d -v-0m -v-1d +'%m %d %Y'
2010-03-04 17:47:51
User: drewk
Functions: date
-4

This produces a parseable output of the last day of the month in future or past. Change the '-v-0m' to be a month plus or minus from the current system time.

utime(){ perl -e "print localtime($1).\"\n\"";}
2009-11-06 12:58:10
User: MoHaG
Functions: perl
1

A shell function using perl to easily convert Unix-time to text.

Put in in your ~/.bashrc or equivalent.

Tested on Linux / Solaris Bourne, bash and zsh. using perl 5.6 and higher.

(Does not require GNU date like some other commands)

perl -e 'print scalar(gmtime(1234567890)), "\n"'
echo "0t${currentEpoch}=Y" | /usr/bin/adb
2009-08-25 12:17:01
User: verboEse
Functions: echo
0

this works on Solaris, so not better than the "only-GNU"-tool :-(

I think, there is no one-liner for this, that will work on all *nix-es

date -d '1 day ago'; date -d '11 hour ago'; date -d '2 hour ago - 3 minute'; date -d '16 hour'
2009-06-01 10:41:56
User: LrdShaper
Functions: date
5

With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me

List all directories created since last week?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me

I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

ldapsearch -v -H ldap://<server> -x -D cn=<johndoe>,cn=<users>,dc=<ourdomain>,dc=<tld> -w<secret> -b ou=<lazystaff>,dc=<ourdomain>,dc=<tld> -s sub sAMAccountName=* '*' | perl -pne 's/(\d{11})\d{7}/"DATE-AD(".scalar(localtime($1-11644473600)).")"/e'
2009-04-22 00:57:34
User: flux
Functions: perl
4

When Ldapsearch queries an Active directory server, all the dates are shown using a timestamp of 18 digits. This perl regexp decodes them in a more human friendly notation. 11644473600 corresponds to some microsoft epoch.

date --date=yesterday