Commands by DaveQB (9)

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Random colours at random locations

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Renaming a file without overwiting an existing file name
Sometimes in a hurry you may move or copy a file using an already existent file name. If you aliased the cp and mv command with the -i option you are prompted for a confirmation before overwriting but if your aliases aren't there you will loose the target file! The -b option will force the mv command to check if the destination file already exists and if it is already there a backup copy with an ending ~ is created.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Freshening up RKhunter
Not everyone reads manpages. Aliasing this command will help with the task of doing audits with RKhunter. It will check for the latest version, update the definitions and then run a check on the system. Hint: alias that in your .bashrc to make life for your fingers easier.

Drop all tables from a database, without deleting it

View all file operator expressions for any file, test, stat
Applies each file operator using the built-in test. $ testt /home/askapache/.sq /home/askapache/.sq -a True - file exists. -d True - file is a directory. -e True - file exists. -r True - file is readable by you. -s True - file exists and is not empty. -w True - the file is writable by you. -x True - the file is executable by you. -O True - the file is effectively owned by you. -G True - the file is effectively owned by your group. -N True - the file has been modified since it was last read. Full Function: testt () { local dp; until [ -z "${1:-}" ]; do dp="$1"; [[ ! -a "$1" ]] && dp="$PWD/$dp"; command ls -w $((${COLUMNS:-80}-20)) -lA --color=tty -d "$dp"; [[ -d "$dp" ]] && find "$dp" -mount -depth -wholename "$dp" -printf '%.5m %10M %#15s %#9u %-9g %#5U %-5G %Am/%Ad/%AY %Cm/%Cd/%CY %Tm/%Td/%TY [%Y] %p\n' -a -quit 2> /dev/null; for f in a b c d e f g h L k p r s S t u w x O G N; do test -$f "$dp" && help test | sed "/-$f F/!d" | sed -e 's#^[\t ]*-\([a-zA-Z]\{1\}\) F[A-Z]*[\t ]* True if#-\1 "'$dp'" #g'; done; shift; done }

Generate a ZenCart-style MD5 password hash.
ZenCart uses a MD5 with a salt to secure its passwords. If you need to forcibly change someone's password to a known value within the database, this one-liner can generate the password. Change the value of 'p' to the password you want.

Remove blank lines from a file using grep and save output to new file
The ^$ within the quotes is a regular expression: ^=beginning of line, $=end of line, with no characters between.

Get CPU thermal data on MacOS


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