Commands by Flameeyes (7)

  • This is a quick replacement for lspci if you need to know what's in a given system but pciutils is not installed. You then need something that can look up the IDs from pci.ids if you want the verbose output. Show Sample Output


    4
    for device in /sys/bus/pci/devices/*; do echo "$(basename ${device} | cut -c '6-') $(cut -c '3-6' ${device}/class): $(cut -c '3-' ${device}/vendor):$(cut -c '3-' ${device}/device)"; done
    Flameeyes · 2012-04-13 03:26:02 0
  • This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host. The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --needed --format "+n#F" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:30:45 0
  • This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation. Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --soname --format "+S#f"
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:26:25 0
  • The command requires app-text/xmlstarlet but it otherwise self-contained. It extracts all the herds and all the maintainers' email for a given package and is what I'm using on the Tinderbox to make it easier for me to report bugs. Show Sample Output


    0
    xmlstarlet sel -t -m '/pkgmetadata/herd' -v . -n -t -m '/pkgmetadata/maintainer' -v email metadata.xml
    Flameeyes · 2010-08-09 22:37:19 0
  • This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.


    5
    gdb --batch --quiet -ex "thread apply all bt full" -ex "quit" ${exe} ${corefile}
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-06 14:49:03 1
  • The output is only partial because runtime dependencies should count in also commands executed via system() and libraries loaded with dlopen(), but at least it gives an idea of what a package directly links to. Note: this is meaningful *only* if you're using -Wl,--as-needed in your LDFLAGS, otherwise it'll bring you a bunch of false positives. Show Sample Output


    2
    qlist --exact "$pkg" | sudo scanelf --needed --quiet --format '%n#F' | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u | qfile --from -
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-06 14:39:15 0
  • Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits. It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster. I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.


    3
    emerge -av1 `qlist --installed --nocolor | uniq | while read cp; do qlist --exact $cp | while read file; do test -e $file || { echo $cp; echo "$cp: missing $file (and maybe more)" 1>&2; break; }; done; done`
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-04 19:55:42 2

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Record MP3 audio via ALSA using ffmpeg
Record audio to an MP3 file via ALSA. Adjust -i argument according to arecord -l output.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
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This command will erase all bytecode versions of Python modules under the current directory.

View advanced Sort options, Quick Reference Help Alias
Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions $ find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast $ history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

ssh autocomplete
Add to your bash profile to minimize carpal tunnel syndrome. Doesn't work with user@hostname but appending "-l user" works fine if needed. Works for ping as well.. complete -W "$(echo `cat ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -f 1 -d ' ' | sed -e s/,.*//g | uniq | grep -v "\["`;)" ping

The NMAP command you can use scan for the Conficker virus on your LAN
This was posted on reddit. replace 192.168.0.1-256 with the IP's you want to check.

Command line calculator
This function defines a command line calculator that handles everything pythons math module can handle, e.g. trigonometric functions, sqrt, log, erf, ... (see http://docs.python.org/library/math.html). It even knows about the constants pi and e.

Show the command line for a PID, converting nulls to spaces and a newline

Watch the progress of 'dd'
need pv (pipe view) : http://www.ivarch.com/programs/pv.shtml

automount samba shares as devices in /mnt/
the middle command between the ; and ; is the vi commands that insert that line into the last line of the file, the esc with the carets is literally hitting the escape key, you have to have the smbfs package installed to do it, I use it to access my iTunes music on my mac from my linux PC's with amarok so I can play the music anywhere in the house. among other things, it allows you to access the files on that share from your computer anytime you're on that network.


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