Commands by Flameeyes (7)

  • This is a quick replacement for lspci if you need to know what's in a given system but pciutils is not installed. You then need something that can look up the IDs from pci.ids if you want the verbose output. Show Sample Output


    4
    for device in /sys/bus/pci/devices/*; do echo "$(basename ${device} | cut -c '6-') $(cut -c '3-6' ${device}/class): $(cut -c '3-' ${device}/vendor):$(cut -c '3-' ${device}/device)"; done
    Flameeyes · 2012-04-13 03:26:02 0
  • This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host. The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --needed --format "+n#F" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:30:45 0
  • This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation. Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --soname --format "+S#f"
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:26:25 0
  • The command requires app-text/xmlstarlet but it otherwise self-contained. It extracts all the herds and all the maintainers' email for a given package and is what I'm using on the Tinderbox to make it easier for me to report bugs. Show Sample Output


    0
    xmlstarlet sel -t -m '/pkgmetadata/herd' -v . -n -t -m '/pkgmetadata/maintainer' -v email metadata.xml
    Flameeyes · 2010-08-09 22:37:19 0
  • This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.


    5
    gdb --batch --quiet -ex "thread apply all bt full" -ex "quit" ${exe} ${corefile}
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-06 14:49:03 1
  • The output is only partial because runtime dependencies should count in also commands executed via system() and libraries loaded with dlopen(), but at least it gives an idea of what a package directly links to. Note: this is meaningful *only* if you're using -Wl,--as-needed in your LDFLAGS, otherwise it'll bring you a bunch of false positives. Show Sample Output


    2
    qlist --exact "$pkg" | sudo scanelf --needed --quiet --format '%n#F' | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u | qfile --from -
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-06 14:39:15 0
  • Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits. It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster. I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.


    3
    emerge -av1 `qlist --installed --nocolor | uniq | while read cp; do qlist --exact $cp | while read file; do test -e $file || { echo $cp; echo "$cp: missing $file (and maybe more)" 1>&2; break; }; done; done`
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-04 19:55:42 2

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Check how far along (in %) your program is in a file
Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. $ xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. $ lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size $ stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea.

Find dead symbolic links

To create files with specific permission:

Mount a VMware virtual disk (.vmdk) file on a Linux box
This does not require you to know the partition offset, kpartx will find all partitions in the image and create loopback devices for them automatically. This works for all types of images (dd of hard drives, img, etc) not just vmkd. You can also activate LVM volumes in the image by running $vgchange -a y and then you can mount the LV inside the image. To unmount the image, umount the partition/LV, deactivate the VG for the image $vgchange -a n then run $kpartx -dv to remove the partition mappings.

Copy a file using pv and watch its progress
pv allows a user to see the progress of data through a pipeline, by giving information such as time elapsed, percentage completed (with progress bar), current throughput rate, total data transferred, and ETA. (man pv)

Resize all JPEGs in a directory
This command requires the imagemagick libraries and will resize all files with the .jpg extension to a width of 1024 pixels and will keep the same proportions as the original image.

find builtin in bash v4+
This command will give you the same list of files as "find /etc/ -name '*killall' | xargs ls -l". In a simpler format just do 'ls /etc/**/file'. It uses shell globbing, so it will also work with other commands, like "cp /etc/**/sshd sshd_backup".

Remove all unused kernels with apt-get
A little aptitude magic. Note: this will remove images AND headers. If you just want to remove images: aptitude remove ?and(~i~nlinux-im ?not(~n`uname -r`)) I used this in zsh without any problems. I'm not sure how other shells will interpret some of the special characters used in the aptitude search terms. Use -s to simulate.

List 10 largest directories in current directory
Directories listed in human-readable format

cycle through a 256 colour palette
just for fun


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