Commands by betsubetsu (7)

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Merge various PDF files

Synchronize date and time with a server over ssh
Shorter, easier to remember version of cmd#7636 NTP is better, but there are situations where it can't be used. In those cases, you can do this to sync the local time to a server.

Delete all empty lines from a file with vim
This command delete all the empty lines (include the lines with space) from a file. g = global command \S = non-whitespace character; !\S the opposite d = delete a range

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Both view and pipe the file without saving to disk
This is a cool trick to view the contents of the file on /dev/pts/0 (or whatever terminal you're using), and also send the contents of that file to another program by way of an unnamed pipe. All the while, you've not bothered saving any extra data to disk, like you might be tempted to do with sed or grep to filter output.

quickly rename a file

Print IP of any interface. Useful for scripts.

Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

Join lines
awk version of 7210. Slightly longer, but expanding it to catch blank lines is easier: $ awk 'BEGIN{RS="\0"}{gsub(/\n+/,"");print}' file.txt

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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