Commands by emacs (9)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Watch how fast the files in a drive are being deleted
This can be useful when a large remove operation is taking place.

Don't spam root. Log your cronjob output to syslog
This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to root@localhost (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX

Multi-line grep
Using perl you can search for patterns spanning several lines, a thing that grep can't do. Append the list of files to above command or pipe a file through it, just as with regular grep. If you add the 's' modifier to the regex, the dot '.' also matches line endings, useful if you don't known how many lines you need are between parts of your pattern. Change '*' to '*?' to make it greedy, that is match only as few characters as possible. See also http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1764/display-a-block-of-text-with-awk to do a similar thing with awk. Edit: The undef has to be put in a begin-block, or a match in the first line would not be found.

Monitoring file handles used by a particular process
-r : repeat mode

Recursively touch all files and subdirectories

Preview of a picture in a terminal
This command allows you to see a preview of a picture via the terminal. It can be usefull when you are ssh'ing your server without X-forwarding. To have en example of the output you can get with this command see http://www.vimeo.com/3721117 Download at http://inouire.net/image-couleur.html Sources here: http://inouire.net/archives/image-couleur_source.tar.gz

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

E-mail a traditional Berkeley mbox to another recipient as individual e-mails.


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