Commands by vutcovici (7)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Copy the full path of a file to the clipboard (requires xclip or similar)
Handy for those times you need to paste a file path in an IDE or some other app. sudo apt-get install xclip Then, for convenience, alias xclip to 'xclip -selection c' so you can just do something like realpath . | xclip

Print line immediately before a matching regex.
Use this if you don't have access to GNU grep's -B option.

recurisvely md5 all files in a tree
Found this little gem here: http://info.michael-simons.eu/2008/10/25/recursively-md5sum-all-files-in-a-directory-tree/

move you up one directory quickly
Alias a single character 'b' to move to parent directory. Put it into your .bashrc or .profile file. Using "cd .." is one of the most repetitive sequence of characters you'll in the command line. Bring it down to two keys 'b' and 'enter'. It stands for "back" Also useful to have multiple: alias b='cd ../' alias bb='cd ../../' alias bbb='cd ../../../' alias bbbb='cd ../../../../'

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Go (cd) directly into a new temp folder
This command create a new temp directory using mktemp (to avoid collisions) and change the current working directory to the created directory.

Recursive Line Count
We use `-not -name ".*"` for the reason we must omit hidden files (which unnecessary). We can only show up total lines like this: $ find * -type f -not -name ".*" | xargs wc -l | tail -1

Perform a branching conditional
This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: $ ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands $ ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution

Show 'Hardware path'-style tree of all devices in Linux


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