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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 364 results
find . -maxdepth 1 ! -name '.' -execdir du -0 -s {} + | sort -znr | gawk 'BEGIN{ORS=RS="\0";} {sub($1 "\t", ""); print $0;}' | xargs -0 du -hs
2009-09-11 16:07:39
User: ashawley
Functions: du find gawk sort xargs
1

A little bit smaller, faster and should handle files with special characters in the name.

diff <(ssh server01 'cd config; find . -type f -exec md5sum {} \;| sort -k 2') <(ssh server02 'cd config;find . -type f -exec md5sum {} \;| sort -k 2')
2009-09-11 15:24:59
User: arcege
Functions: diff find md5sum sort ssh
14

This can be much faster than downloading one or both trees to a common servers and comparing the files there. After, only those files could be copied down for deeper comparison if needed.

cat /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list > /tmp/listin ; ls /proc/*/exe |xargs -l readlink | grep -xvFf /tmp/listin; rm /tmp/listin
2009-09-09 18:09:14
User: kamathln
Functions: cat grep ls readlink rm xargs
Tags: Debian find dpkg
11

This helped me find a botnet that had made into my system. Of course, this is not a foolproof or guarantied way to find all of them or even most of them. But it helped me find it.

zip -r foo.zip DIR -x "*/.svn/*"
find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -type f | xargs zip XXXXX.zip
find . -name \*.c | xargs wc -l | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}'
2009-09-08 08:25:45
User: karpoke
Functions: awk find tail wc xargs
Tags: awk find wc
0

This is really fast :)

time find . -name \*.c | xargs wc -l | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}'

204753

real 0m0.191s

user 0m0.068s

sys 0m0.116s

find . -regex '.*\(h\|cpp\)'
2009-09-06 11:33:19
User: Vereb
Functions: find
Tags: bash find
7

This is the way how you can find header and cpp files in the same time.

find . -name .svn -prune -o -print
2009-09-04 17:41:33
User: arcege
Functions: find
Tags: svn find
6

Put the positive clauses after the '-o' option.

find . -type f -name '*.c' -exec wc -l {} \; | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}'
2009-09-04 15:51:30
User: arcege
Functions: awk find wc
Tags: awk find wc
-1

Have wc work on each file then add up the total with awk; get a 43% speed increase on RHEL over using "-exec cat|wc -l" and a 67% increase on my Ubuntu laptop (this is with 10MB of data in 767 files).

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d|xargs du -a --max-depth=0|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '1d'|while read i;do echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/";done;find . -maxdepth 1 -type f|xargs du -a|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '$d'|while read i;do du -h "$i";done
2009-09-03 20:33:21
User: nickwe
Functions: cut du echo find read sed sort xargs
2

Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals and sort directory and files

find . -type f -exec grep -qi 'foo' {} \; -print0 | xargs -0 vim
2009-09-03 17:55:26
User: arcege
Functions: find grep xargs
Tags: vim find grep
-1

Make sure that find does not touch anything other than regular files, and handles non-standard characters in filenames while passing to xargs.

find . -exec grep foobar /dev/null {} \; | awk -F: '{print $1}' | xargs vi
find /backup/directory -name "FILENAME_*" -mtime +15 -exec rm -vf {};
rm -vf /backup/directory/**/FILENAME_*(m+15)
find /backup/directory -name "FILENAME_*" -mtime +15 | xargs rm -vf
rmdir **/*(/^F)
find . -type d -empty -delete
2009-08-22 09:03:14
User: hemanth
Functions: find
Tags: find rmdir
6

You can also use, $ find . -depth -type d -exec rmdir {} \; 2>/dev/null

find / -name "*.pdf" -exec cp -t ~/Documents/PDF {} +
2009-08-18 06:11:35
Functions: cp find
Tags: find cp for
8

I used this to copy all PDFs recursively to a selected dir

IFS=:; find $PATH | grep pattern
2009-08-14 13:38:58
User: camspiers
Functions: find grep
Tags: bash find grep
1

Best to put it in a file somewhere in your path. (I call the file spath)

#!/bin/bash

IFS=:; find $PATH | grep $1

Usage: $ spath php

find . -type f -printf '%20s %p\n' | sort -n | cut -b22- | tr '\n' '\000' | xargs -0 ls -laSr
2009-08-13 13:13:33
User: fsilveira
Functions: cut find ls sort tr xargs
Tags: sort find ls
10

This command will find the biggest files recursively under a certain directory, no matter if they are too many. If you try the regular commands ("find -type f -exec ls -laSr {} +" or "find -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -laSr") the sorting won't be correct because of command line arguments limit.

This command won't use command line arguments to sort the files and will display the sorted list correctly.

mate - `find * -type f -regex 'REGEX_A' | grep -v -E 'REGEX_B'`
2009-08-12 22:24:08
User: irae
Functions: grep
1

This does the following:

1 - Search recursively for files whose names match REGEX_A

2 - From this list exclude files whose names match REGEX_B

3 - Open this as a group in textmate (in the sidebar)

And now you can use Command+Shift+F to use textmate own find and replace on this particular group of files.

For advanced regex in the first expression you can use -regextype posix-egrep like this:

mate - `find * -type f -regextype posix-egrep -regex 'REGEX_A' | grep -v -E 'REGEX_B'`

Warning: this is not ment to open files or folders with space os special characters in the filename. If anyone knows a solution to that, tell me so I can fix the line.

find . -name "*.[ch]" | xargs grep "TODO"
find $MAILDIR/ -type f -printf '%T@ %p\n' | sort --reverse | sed -e '{ 1,100d; s/[0-9]*\.[0-9]* \(.*\)/\1/g }' | xargs -i sh -c "cat {}&&rm -f {}" | gzip -c >>ARCHIVE.gz
rm -d **/*(/^F)
2009-08-06 21:41:19
User: claytron
Functions: rm
Tags: find zsh glob
4

This command uses the recursive glob and glob qualifiers from zsh. This will remove all the empty directories from the current directory down.

The **/* recurses down through all the files and directories

The glob qualifiers are added into the parenthesis. The / means only directories. The F means 'full' directories, and the ^ reverses that to mean non-full directories. For more info on these qualifiers see the zsh docs: http://zsh.dotsrc.org/Doc/Release/Expansion.html#SEC87

find . -depth -type d -empty -exec rmdir -v {} +
2009-08-05 13:48:13
User: syssyphus
Functions: find rmdir
Tags: find
7

this will show the names of the deleted directories, and will delete directories that only no files, only empty directories.