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Commands tagged Linux from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged Linux - 240 results
grep -2 -iIr "err\|warn\|fail\|crit" /var/log/*
2009-06-17 19:41:04
User: miketheman
Functions: grep
6

Using the grep command, retrieve all lines from any log files in /var/log/ that have one of the problem states

date -d '1 day ago'; date -d '11 hour ago'; date -d '2 hour ago - 3 minute'; date -d '16 hour'
2009-06-01 10:41:56
User: LrdShaper
Functions: date
5

With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me

List all directories created since last week?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me

I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

net rpc shutdown -I ipAddressOfWindowsPC -U username%password
2009-05-31 07:18:01
User: LrdShaper
Functions: shutdown
Tags: Linux windows
113

This will issue a shutdown command to the Windows machine. username must be an administrator on the Windows machine. Requires samba-common package installed. Other relevant commands are:

net rpc shutdown -r : reboot the Windows machine

net rpc abortshutdown : abort shutdown of the Windows machine

Type:

net rpc

to show all relevant commands

for i in `svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | sed -r 's/\+\s+//' | awk '{ print $2 }'` ; do if [ ! -d $i ] ; then php -l $i ; fi ; done
2009-05-29 23:59:28
Functions: awk egrep sed
Tags: svn Linux PHP
0

Really only valuable in a PHP-only project directory. This is using standard linux versions of the tools. On most older BSD variants of sed, use -E instead of -r. Or use: sed 's/\+[[:space:]]\{1,\}//' instead.

lsof -nP +p 24073 | grep -i listen | awk '{print $1,$2,$7,$8,$9}'
lsb_release -d
pwsafe -qa "gpg keys"."$(finger `whoami` | grep Name | awk '{ print $4" "$5 }')"
2009-05-07 14:49:56
User: denzuko
0

From time to time one forgets either thier gpg key or other passphrases. This can be very problematic in most cases. But luckily there's this script. Its based off of pwsafe which is a unix commandline program that manages encrypted password databases. For more info on pwsafe visit, http://nsd.dyndns.org/pwsafe/.

What this script does is it will help you store all your passphrases for later on and allow you to copy it to your clipboard so you can just paste it in, all with one password. Pretty neat no?

You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at The Teachings of Master Denzuko - denzuko.wordpress.com.

alias somafm='read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls'
2009-05-05 12:13:46
User: denzuko
Functions: alias
-2

This is the alias command that I discussed in my prior release which you can add to your ~/.bashrc.

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at the teachings of master denzuko - denzuko.co.cc.

lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
2009-05-05 07:52:10
User: xizdaqrian
Functions: grep sed
0

This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path.

read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls
2009-05-04 00:26:19
User: denzuko
Functions: read
11

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

Also, don't forget to add this as alias(ie alias somafm="read -p 'Which Station? "; mplayer --reallyquite -vo none -ao sdl

for i in `screen -ls | perl -ne'if(/^\s+\d+\.([^\s]+)/){print $1, " "}'`; do gnome-terminal -e "screen -x $i"; done
2009-04-25 22:39:24
User: hank
Functions: perl
Tags: screen Linux perl
2

There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.

for i in /sys/class/net/*; do e=`basename $i`; echo "# $e"; sudo ethtool $e | grep -E "Link|Speed" ; done
2009-04-25 14:32:08
User: hank
Functions: echo grep sudo
Tags: Network Linux
0

Basically an improvement on an earlier ethtool command line.

lsof -i
sudo vi /etc/fstab; Go//smb-share/gino /mnt/place smbfs defaults,username=gino,password=pass 0 0<esc>:wq; mount //smb-share/gino
2009-04-02 16:04:35
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: mount sudo vi
4

the middle command between the ; and ; is the vi commands that insert that line into the last line of the file, the esc with the carets is literally hitting the escape key, you have to have the smbfs package installed to do it, I use it to access my iTunes music on my mac from my linux PC's with amarok so I can play the music anywhere in the house. among other things, it allows you to access the files on that share from your computer anytime you're on that network.

dstat -ta
for i in $(seq 1 11) 13 14 15 16; do man iso-8859-$i; done
2009-03-31 19:40:15
User: penpen
Functions: man seq
Tags: Linux unix
-2

Depending on the installation only certain of these man pages are installed. 12 is left out on purpose because ISO/IEC 8859-12 does not exist. To also access those manpages that are not installed use opera (or any other browser that supports all the character sets involved) to display online versions of the manpages hosted at kernel.org:

for i in $(seq 1 11) 13 14 15 16; do opera http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man7/iso_8859-$i.7.html; done
wget --server-response --spider http://www.example.com/
2009-03-31 18:49:14
User: penpen
Functions: wget
7

Let me suggest using wget for obtaining the HTTP header only as the last resort because it generates considerable textual overhead. The first ellipsis of the sample output stands for

Spider mode enabled. Check if remote file exists.

--2009-03-31 20:42:46-- http://www.example.com/

Resolving www.example.com... 208.77.188.166

Connecting to www.example.com|208.77.188.166|:80... connected.

HTTP request sent, awaiting response...

and the second one looks for

Length: 438 [text/html]

Remote file exists and could contain further links,

but recursion is disabled -- not retrieving.

lynx -dump -head http://www.example.com/
2009-03-31 18:41:36
User: penpen
-1

Without the -dump option the header is displayed in lynx. You can also use w3m, the command then is

w3m -dump_head http://www.example.com/
rev <<< 'lorem ipsum' | tee /dev/stderr | rev
2009-03-31 13:12:09
User: penpen
Functions: rev tee
Tags: Linux unix
2

In the above example 'muspi merol' (the output of the first rev command) is sent to stderr and 'lorem ipsum' (the output of the second rev command) is sent to stdout. rev reverse lines of a file or files. This use of tee allows testing if a program correctly handles its input without using files that hold the data.

alias rot13="tr '[A-Za-z]' '[N-ZA-Mn-za-m]'"
2009-03-30 19:08:49
User: penpen
Functions: alias
Tags: Linux unix
10

rot13 maps a..mn..z (A..MN..Z) to n..za..m (n..za..m) and so does this alias.

watch -tn1 'bc<<<"`date -d'\''friday 21:00'\'' +%s`-`date +%s`"|perl -ne'\[email protected]=gmtime($_);printf("%dd %02d:%02d:%02d\n",@p[7,2,1,0]);'\'
2009-03-29 19:53:36
User: penpen
Functions: perl watch
Tags: Linux unix date
-2

An improved version of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1772/simple-countdown-from-a-given-date that uses Perl to pretty-print the output. Note that the GNU-style '--no-title' option has been replaced by its one-letter counterpart '-t'.

iptables -F && iptables -X && iptables -P INPUT ACCEPT && iptables -OUTPUT ACCEPT
2009-03-27 15:03:54
User: lme
Functions: iptables
Tags: Linux iptables
0

This turns your iptables packet filter to a "Allow any from any to any" filter, so you can rule out any filtering issues when you have a problem to enable a connection from or to your host.

To re-enable it, run /etc/init.d/iptables restart

while true; do X=$Y; sleep 1; Y=$(ifconfig eth0|grep RX\ bytes|awk '{ print $2 }'|cut -d : -f 2); echo "$(( Y-X )) bps"; done
scrot -e 'mv $f \$HOME/shots/; sitecopy -u shots; echo "\$BASE/$f" | xsel -i; feh `xsel -o`'
2009-03-26 12:08:39
User: penpen
Functions: echo
-1

Here $HOME/shots must exist and have appropriate access rights and sitecopy must be correctly set up to upload new screen shots to the remote site.

Example .sitecopyrc (for illustration purposes only)

site shots

server ftp.example.com

username user

password antabakadesuka

local /home/penpen/shots

remote public_html/shots

permissions ignore

The command uses scrot to create a screen shot, moves it to the screen shot directory, uploads it using screen uses xsel to copy the URL to the paste buffer (so that you can paste it with a middle click) and finally uses feh to display a preview of the screen shot.

Note that $BASE stands for the base URL for the screen shots on the remote server, replace it by the actual location; in the example http://www.example.com/~user/shots would be fitting.

Assign this command to a key combination or an icon in whatever panel you use.

scrot -e 'mv $f \$HOME/public_html/shots/; echo "http://\$HOSTNAME/~\$USER/shots/$f" | xsel -i; feh `xsel -o`'
2009-03-26 11:32:09
User: penpen
Functions: echo
0

A web server using $HOME/public_html as user directory is required, $HOME/public_html/shots must exist and have appropriate access rights and $HOSTNAME must be known to and accessible from the outside world.

The command uses scrot to create a screen shot, moves it to the screen shot directory, uses xsel to copy the URL to the paste buffer (so that you can paste it with a middle click) and finally uses feh to display a preview of the screen shot.

Assign this command to a key combination or an icon in whatever panel you use.