Commands by nnsense (8)

  • Docker's local man pages are (often) half of what you have online, so I wanted that as local man. Install lynx and run my oneliner, then use as follows: dockpage Adjust lynx's page width at will Show Sample Output


    0
    dockpage() { lynx -width=180 --dump https://docs.docker.com/v1.11/engine/reference/commandline/$1/ | sed -n '/^Usage/,/On this page/{/On this page/b;p}'; }
    nnsense · 2017-09-18 23:53:34 4
  • Usefull, for example, when many ports are exposed and the docker ps output looks cluttered. Show Sample Output


    0
    alias dockps='docker ps --format "table {{.ID}}\t{{.Image}}\t{{.Status}}\t{{.Names}}"'
    nnsense · 2017-09-18 23:46:47 0
  • Sometimes it's useful to output just the ip address. Or some other information, changing the "ipv4.addresses" in command. The power of awk! Show all possible "greps" with nmcli connection show [yourInterfaceNameHere] Show Sample Output


    2
    showip() { nmcli connection show $1|grep ipv4.addresses|awk '{print $2}' ; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-13 16:24:28 4
  • This is a common use of bind. Hitting any key after will output the key's character sequence. This makes possible using it into a bind command. So pressing ctrl+v and then F2 will output "^[[12~", once binded every time you'll press the function key F2 it will execute your command. Added the \n to make it execute it as well. Show Sample Output


    1
    bind '"<ctrl+v><functionKey>":"command\n"'
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 17:59:09 3
  • I copied this (let's be honest) somewhere on internet and I just made it as a function ready to be used as alias. It shows the 10 most used commands from history. This seems to be just another "most used commands from history", but hey.. this is a function!!! :D Show Sample Output


    1
    mosth() { history | awk '{CMD[$2]++;count++;}END { for (a in CMD)print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a;}' | grep -v "./" | column -c3 -s " " -t | sort -nr | nl | head -n10; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 17:41:55 4
  • Many times I give the same commands in loop to find informations about a file. I use this as an alias to summarize that informations in a single command. Now with variables! :D Show Sample Output


    2
    fileinfo() { RPMQF=$(rpm -qf $1); RPMQL=$(rpm -ql $RPMQF);echo "man page:";whatis $(basename $1); echo "Services:"; echo -e "$RPMQL\n"|grep -P "\.service";echo "Config files:";rpm -qc $RPMQF;echo "Provided by:" $RPMQF; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 16:46:01 4
  • I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course). For rpm based systems ;) Show Sample Output


    1
    qf2s() { rpm -ql $(rpm -qf $1)|grep -P "\.service"; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 16:32:16 0
  • Not really alternative, just giving a different behavior listing current directory if no directory given.


    0
    cdls() { if [[ $1 != "" ]] ; then cd $1; ls; else ls; fi };
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 15:52:09 3

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backup your history
simple and easy backup your history with timestamp

Easily search running processes (alias).

File browser
Simple file browser with dmenu, ls, and xdg-open.

list files recursively by size

Update a tarball
This will update the tarball, adding files that have changed since the last update. This assumes that the tarball is in the same directory as the files being archived. N.B. This command can't be used on compressed tarballs. N.B. This will add the updated files to the tarball, so that the tarball will have two versions of each file. This will make the tarball larger, but doesn't have any other significant effect.

Turns hidden applications transparent in the Mac OS X dock.
In Mac OS X, pressing Command+H will hide an application. While that application's windows vanish, there is no other visual feedback, meaning there is no immediate distinction between an application running with no windows open and a hidden application. This command turns hidden applications' icons transparent, providing a clear and obvious distinction. Change YES to NO to restore the previous functionality.

Download file with multiple simultaneous connections
jrk's aria2 example is incorrect. -s specifies the global connection limit; the per-host connection limit is specified with -x.

Nginx - print all optional modules before compilation
wget http://nginx.org/download/nginx-1.15.3.tar.gz && tar -xzf 1.15.3.tar.gz && cd nginx-1.15.3

Function that outputs dots every second until command completes
Very useful in shell scripts because you can run a task nicely in the background using job-control and output progress until it completes. Here's an example of how I use it in backup scripts to run gpg in the background to encrypt an archive file (which I create in this same way). $! is the process ID of the last run command, which is saved here as the variable PI, then sleeper is called with the process id of the gpg task (PI), and sleeper is also specified to output : instead of the default . every 3 seconds instead of the default 1. So a shorter version would be sleeper $!; The wait is also used here, though it may not be needed on your system. $ echo ">>> ENCRYPTING SQL BACKUP" $ gpg --output archive.tgz.asc --encrypt archive.tgz 1>/dev/null & $ PI=$!; sleeper $PI ":" 3; wait $PI && rm archive.tgz &>/dev/null Previously to get around the $! not always being available, I would instead check for the existance of the process ID by checking if the directory /proc/$PID existed, but not everyone uses proc anymore. That version is currently the one at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html but I plan on upgrading to this new version soon.

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