Commands tagged playlist (8)

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SVN Command line branch merge
This will merge all of the changes from {rev_num} to head on the branch to the current working directory

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

scp a good script from host A which has no public access to host C, but with a hop by host B
middlehost allows ssh access from where you are but not securehost. Use nice ssh piping to simulate scp through A => B => C setting up the shell function if left as an exercise for the reader. ;-) Agent forwarding should avoid password typing.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
Sorted in human readable format.

Uptime in minute
Want to run scripts/programs in the system after starting X minute [ For letting the system to free ]? This will give uptime in minute.

Truncate 0.3 sec from an audio file using sox
Using this command one can cut a piece from the end of an audio file.

Insert a line at the top of a text file without sed or awk or bash loops
Yet another way to add a line at the top a of text file with the help of the tac command (reverse cat).

cd to (or operate on) a file across parallel directories
This is useful for quickly jumping around branches in a file system, or operating on a parellel file. This is tested in bash. cd to (substitute in PWD, a for b) where PWD is the bash environmental variable for the "working directory"

find all file larger than 500M
Greater than 500M and sorted by size.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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