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Commands using ls from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ls - 462 results
rsync -av --link-dest=$(ls -1d /backup/*/ | tail -1) /data/ /backup/$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M)/
2010-08-05 19:36:24
User: dooblem
Functions: date ls rsync tail
Tags: backup rsync
1

'data' is the directory to backup, 'backup' is directory to store snapshots.

Backup files on a regular basis using hard links. Very efficient, quick. Backup data is directly available.

Same as explained here :

http://blog.interlinked.org/tutorials/rsync_time_machine.html

in one line.

Using du to check the size of your backups, the first backup counts for all the space, and other backups only files that have changed.

ls -d $PWD/*
ls | sed s#^#$(pwd)/#
2010-08-04 20:47:44
User: randy909
Functions: ls sed
2

This version is a bit more portable although it isn't extended as easily with '-type f' etc. On AIX the find command doesn't have -maxdepth or equivalent.

gominify() { if [ $# -ne 2 ]; then echo 'gominify < src > < dst >'; return; fi; s="$1"; d="$2"; java -jar yui.jar $s >$d; if [ $? == 0 ]; then a=$( ls -sh $s | awk '{print $1}' ); b=$( ls -sh $d | awk '{print $1}' ); echo "Saved $s ($a) to $d ($b)"; fi;}
2010-08-03 10:19:24
User: meathive
Functions: awk echo ls
-2

This command, or a derivative like it, is a must-have if you're a server administrator interested in website optimization: https://kinqpinz.info/?%C2%B6=287a7ba6

Command requires Yahoo's YUI, find it here: http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/

cat $(ls -c | grep ogg | tac ) > directory/test.ogg
sudo ls -l $(eval echo "/proc/{$(echo $(pgrep java)|sed 's/ /,/')}/fd/")|grep log|sed 's/[^/]* //g'|xargs -r tail -f
2010-07-30 18:20:00
User: vutcovici
Functions: echo eval grep ls sed sudo tail xargs
-1

Tail all logs that are opened by all java processes. This is helpful when you are on a new environment and you do not know where the logs are located. Instead of java you can put any process name. This command does work only for Linux.

The list of all log files opened by java process:

sudo ls -l $(eval echo "/proc/{$(echo $(pgrep java)|sed 's/ /,/')}/fd/")|grep log|sed 's/[^/]* //g'
ls !(*.gz)
2010-07-29 23:47:26
User: c0t0d0
Functions: ls
Tags: ls glob
29

Negative shell globs already come with bash. Make sure to turn on extended pattern matching with 'shopt -e extglob'.

ls -I "*.gz"
2010-07-29 22:40:19
User: CodSpirit
Functions: ls
Tags: ls glob
7

Hides some entries from listing.

ls *[^.gz]
2010-07-29 20:25:48
User: elofland
Functions: ls
Tags: ls glob
1

I've been looking for a way to do this for a while, get a not pattern for shell globs. This works, I'm using to grab logs from a remote server via scp.

ls -la | grep $(date +%Y-%m-%d) | egrep -v -e '\.{1,2}' | sed "s/.*\:[0-9]\{2\} \(.\+\)$/\\1/g"
today=`date +%d`; ls -ltr | rm -f `nawk -v _today=$today '{ if($5 != 0 && $7 < _today) { print $9 } }'`
2010-07-29 13:47:19
User: alex__
Functions: ls rm
0

Delete all files that its size it's different than 0 and older than actuall day.

ls -l --time-style=+%Y-%m-%d | awk "/$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')/ {print \$7}"
2010-07-29 05:30:29
Functions: awk ls
1

This version eliminates the grep before the awk, which is always good. It works for GNU core utils and ensures that the date output of ls matches the format in the pattern match, regardless of locale, etc.

On BSD-based systems, you can easily eliminate both the grep and the awk:

find . -maxdepth 1 -Btime -$(date +%kh%lm) -type f

for file in $(ls /usr/bin ) ; do man -w $file 2>> nomanlist.txt >/dev/null ; done
2010-07-26 19:39:53
User: camocrazed
Functions: file ls man
Tags: man
-2

This takes quite a while on my system. You may want to test it out with /bin first, or background it and keep working.

If you want to get rid of the "No manual entry for [whatever]" and just have the [whatever], use the following sed command after this one finishes.

sed -n 's/^No manual entry for \(.*\)/\1/p' nomanlist.txt
rm $( ls | egrep -v 'abc|\s' )
2010-07-18 10:59:15
User: dbbolton
Functions: egrep ls rm
Tags: grep rm
-1

Really, you deserve whatever happens if you have a whitespace character in a file name, but this has a small safety net. The truly paranoid will use '-i'.

url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5bYDhZBFLA; youtube-dl -b $url; mplayer $(ls ${url##*=}*| tail -n1) -ss 00:57 -endpos 10 -vo gif89a:fps=5:output=output.gif -vf scale=400:300 -nosound
2010-07-18 02:11:39
User: zed
Functions: ls tail
12

requires "youtube-dl" -- sure you can do this with wget and some more obscurity but why waste your time when this great tool is available?

the guts consist of mplayer converting a video to a gif -- study this command and read the man page for more information

mplayer video.flv -ss 00:23 -endpos 6 -vo gif89a:fps=5:output=output.gif -vf scale=400:300 -nosound

generates a 6 second gif starting at 23 seconds of play time at 5 fps and a scale of 400x300

start time (-ss)/end time (-endpos) formats: 00:00:00.000

end time should be relative to start time, not absolute. i.e. -endpos 5 == seconds after 0:42 = 0:47 end point

play with fps and scale for lower gif sizes

the subshell is a solution for the -b flag on youtube-dl which downloads the best quality video, sometimes, which can be various video formats $(ls ${url##*=}*| tail -n1)

ls -l $(find ./ -type l | perl -ne 'chomp; if (-d) { print "$_\n" }')
2010-07-16 19:31:28
User: rwadkins
Functions: find ls perl
-1

This will list all symlinks that are directories under the current directory. This will help you distinguish them from regular files.

ls -l `which foo`
2010-07-09 01:34:02
User: adeverteuil
Functions: ls
1

You may also use the $(which foo) variant instead of backticks. I personnaly have an alias ll='ls -l'.

fortune | cowsay -f $(ls /usr/share/cowsay/cows/ | shuf -n1)
2010-07-08 02:57:52
User: zed
Functions: ls
8

You need to have fortune and cowsay installed. It uses a subshell to list cow files in you cow directory (this folder is default for debian based systems, others might use another folder).

you can add it to your .bashrc file to have it great you with something interesting every time you start a new session.

bsro3 () { P=`pwd`; S=$1; R=$2; ls *.odt > /dev/null 2>&1; if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]; then exit 1; fi; for i in *.odt; do mkdir ${P}/T; cd ${P}/T; unzip -qq "$P"/"$i"; sed -i "s/$S/$R/" ${P}/T/content.xml; zip -qq -r "$P"/"$i" *; cd ${P}; rm -rf ${P}/T; done; }
2010-06-30 04:43:54
User: danpos
Functions: cd exit ls mkdir rm sed
2

This function does a batch edition of all OOO3 Writer files in current directory. It uses sed to search a FOO pattern into body text of each file, then replace it to foo pattern (only the first match) . I did it because I've some hundreds of OOO3 Writer files where I did need to edit one word in each ones and open up each file in OOO3 gui wasn't an option. Usage: bsro3 FOO foo

find / -type f -name *.tar.gz -size +10M -exec ls -l {} \;
2010-06-29 12:39:02
User: 0disse0
Functions: find ls
Tags: find ls exec rm type
0

Please be careful while executing the following command as you don?t want

to delete the files by mistake. The best practice is to execute the same

command with ls ?l to make sure you know which files will get deleted when

you execute the command with rm.

while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
2010-06-15 01:20:27
User: evil
Functions: cut echo ls
0

This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh.

1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands.

2. Run the command

3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command

4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is.

5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander

6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer.

Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner).

Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.

while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
2010-06-13 18:45:02
User: evil
Functions: cut ls
2

Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander

guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander

lol

find directory -maxdepth 1 -type f | xargs ls -l | awk 'BEGIN { SUM=0} { SUM+=$5 } END { print SUM/2^20 }'
ls -l directory | awk 'BEGIN { SUM=0 } { SUM+=$5 } END { print SUM/1024/1024"M" }'
find / -type f -size +500000k -exec ls -lh {} \; | awk '{ print $9 ": " $5 }'