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Commands using perl from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using perl - 335 results
echo "$url" | perl -MURI::Escape -ne 'chomp;print uri_escape($_),"\n"'
2010-02-13 00:44:48
User: eightmillion
Functions: echo perl
Tags: perl
5

Converts reserved characters in a URI to their percent encoded counterparts.

Alternate python version:

echo "$url" | python -c 'import sys,urllib;print urllib.quote(sys.stdin.read().strip())'
weather(){ curl -s "http://api.wunderground.com/auto/wui/geo/ForecastXML/index.xml?query=${@:-<YOURZIPORLOCATION>}"|perl -ne '/<title>([^<]+)/&&printf "%s: ",$1;/<fcttext>([^<]+)/&&print $1,"\n"';}
2010-02-10 01:23:39
User: eightmillion
Functions: perl
7

This shell function grabs the weather forecast for the next 24 to 48 hours from weatherunderground.com. Replace <YOURZIPORLOCATION> with your zip code or your "city, state" or "city, country", then calling the function without any arguments returns the weather for that location. Calling the function with a zip code or place name as an argument returns the weather for that location instead of your default.

To add a bit of color formatting to the output, use the following instead:

weather(){ curl -s "http://api.wunderground.com/auto/wui/geo/ForecastXML/index.xml?query=${@:-<YOURZIPORLOCATION>}"|perl -ne '/<title>([^<]+)/&&printf "\x1B[0;34m%s\x1B[0m: ",$1;/<fcttext>([^<]+)/&&print $1,"\n"';}

Requires: perl, curl

perl -e 'while(1){print"> ";eval<>}'
2010-02-03 21:48:33
User: kzh
Functions: perl
10

My Programming Languages professor assigned my class a homework assignment where we had to write a Perl interpreter using Perl. I really like Python's interactive command line interpreter which inspired this Perl script.

$ xrandr -q|perl -F'\s|,' -lane "/^Sc/&&print join '',@F[8..10]"
export QQ=$(mktemp -d);(cd $QQ; curl -s -O http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse/sort-by-votes/plaintext/[0-2400:25];for i in $(perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if( /^(\w+\(\))/ )' *|sort -u);do grep -h -m1 -B1 $i *; done)|grep -v '^--' > clf.sh;rm -r $QQ
2010-01-30 19:47:42
User: bartonski
Functions: cd export grep mktemp perl sort
8

Each shell function has its own summary line, as a comment. If there are multiple shell functions with the same name, the function with the highest number of votes is put into the file.

Note: added 'grep -v' to the end of the pipeline, to eliminate extraneous lines containing only '--'. Thanks to matthewbauer for pointing this out.

define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Po '(?<=<li>)[^<]+'|nl|perl -MHTML::Entities -pe 'decode_entities($_)' 2>/dev/null;}
2010-01-29 05:01:11
User: eightmillion
Functions: grep perl
18

This function takes a word or a phrase as arguments and then fetches definitions using Google's "define" syntax. The "nl" and perl portion isn't strictly necessary. It just makes the output a bit more readable, but this also works:

define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Po '(?<=<li>)[^<]+';}

If your version of grep doesn't have perl compatible regex support, then you can use this version:

define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Eo '<li>[^<]+'|sed 's/<li>//g'|nl|perl -MHTML::Entities -pe 'decode_entities($_)' 2>/dev/null;}
mgc() { grep --exclude=cscope* --color=always -rni $1 . |perl -pi -e 's/:/ +/' |perl -pi -e 's/^(.+)$/vi $1/g' |perl -pi -e 's/:/ /'; }
2010-01-26 17:00:01
Functions: grep perl
1

This is a big time saver for me. I often grep source code and need to edit the findings. A single highlight of the mouse and middle mouse click (in gnome terminal) and I'm editing the exact line I just found. The color highlighting helps interpret the data.

perl -pe's/([\d.]+)/localtime $1/e;'
2010-01-19 18:47:58
User: tuxtutorials
Functions: perl
3

Converts Unix epoch time to localtime. Useful for any logs that only display epoch time.

perl -i~ -0777pe's/^/\!\#\/usr\/bin\/ksh\n/' testing
perl -le 'print $!+0, "\t", $!++ for 0..127'
grepp() { [ $# -eq 1 ] && perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" || perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" < "$2";}
2010-01-12 04:30:15
User: eightmillion
Functions: perl
13

This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input.

grepp <PATTERN> <FILE>

or

<SOMECOMMAND> | grepp <PATTERN>
perl -le'print"-"x50'
2010-01-06 17:06:07
User: sputnick
Functions: perl
Tags: jot
4

Perl is installed by default on most modern OS when jot is not.

sfdisk /dev/sdb <(sfdisk -d /dev/sda| perl -pi -e 's/sda/sdb/g')
2009-12-22 22:45:41
Functions: perl
-3

*as long as the drives are exactly the same* then this command copies the partition table on /dev/sda to /dev/sdb

<command> | perl -pe '/<regex/ && exit;'
2009-12-22 15:05:49
User: intuited
Functions: perl
0

Doesn't display the matching line. If you want that behaviour, you need to add "print && " before the 'exit'.

<your command here> | perl -n -e 'print "$_" if 1 ... /<regex>/;'
2009-12-22 14:06:41
User: SuperFly
Functions: command perl
0

This command line will display the output of , from the first line of output, until the first time it sees a pattern matching .

You could specify the regex pattern /^$/ to look for the first blank line,

or /^foobar/ to look for the first line that starts with the word foobar.

perl -wl -e '@f=<>; for $i (0 .. $#f) { $r=int rand ($i+1); @f[$i, $r]=@f[$r,$i] if ($i!=$r); } chomp @f; print join $/, @f;' try.txt
perl -e 'for(@ARGV){s/x/*/g;s/v/sqrt /g;s/\^/**/g};print eval(join("",@ARGV)),$/;'
2009-12-21 21:03:27
User: JohnGH
Functions: perl
2

Once I wrote a command line calculator program in C, then I found this... and added to it a bit.

For ease of use I normally use this in a tiny Perl program (which I call pc for 'Perl Calculator')

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

die "Usage: $0 MATHS\n" unless(@ARGV);for(@ARGV){s/x/*/g;s/v/sqrt /g;s/\^/**/g};

print eval(join('',@ARGV)),$/;

It handles square roots, power, modulus:

pc 1+2 (1 plus 2)

3

pc 3x4 (3 times 4)

12

pc 5^6 (5 to the power of 6)

15625

pc v 49 ( square root of 49 )

7

pc 12/3 (12 divided by 3)

4

pc 19%4 (19 modulus 4)

3

(you can string maths together too)

pc 10 x 10 x 10

1000

pc 10 + 10 + 10 / 2

25

pc 7 x v49

49

perl -lne 'print for /url":"\K[^"]+/g' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q)
2009-12-14 00:51:54
User: sputnick
Functions: ls perl sed
0

If you want all the URLs from all the sessions, you can use :

perl -lne 'print for /url":"\K[^"]+/g' ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js

Thanks to tybalt89 ( idea of the "for" statement ).

For perl purists, there's JSON and File::Slurp modules, buts that's not installed by default.

x=IO::Interface::Simple; perl -e 'use '$x';' &>/dev/null || cpan -i "$x"; perl -e 'use '$x'; my $ip='$x'->new($ARGV[0]); print $ip->address,$/;' <INTERFACE>
2009-12-13 02:23:40
User: sputnick
Functions: perl
1

Thanks to comment if that works or not...

If you have already typed that snippet or you know you already have IO::Interface::Simple perl module, you can type only the last command :

perl -e 'use IO::Interface::Simple; my $ip=IO::Interface::Simple->new($ARGV[0]); print $ip->address,$/;' <INTERFACE>

( The first perl command will install the module if it's not there already... )

perl -e 'use strict; use warnings; my $c; my $file = $ARGV[0]; open my $handle, "<", $file or die "$0: $file: $!\n"; while (<$handle>) { print $c++, " " x 5, $_; } close($handle);' <FILE>
2009-12-09 16:07:14
User: sputnick
Functions: perl
0

This is a joke for @putnamhill and @glaudiston

I'm pretty sure we can write longer if we want ;)

perl -pe 'print "$. "' <file>
perl -ne 'print "$. - $_"' infile.txt
2009-12-08 15:27:39
User: netp
Functions: perl
-1

This command prints all lines of a file together with is line number.

perl -e '$_=`ifconfig eth0`;/\d+.\d+.\d+.\d+ /; print $&,"\n";'
2009-12-05 14:24:48
Functions: perl
0

If you are interested in interfaces other than eth0 you will need to change eth0 to your interface name.

You could use this mammoth to nab the ip4 addresses of all your interfaces

perl -e '@_=`ifconfig -a`; sort(@_); foreach(@_) { /(inet addr\:)(\d+.\d+.\d+.\d+ )/; $_=$2; @uniq=grep($_ ne $prev && (($prev) = $_), @_);} print join "\n",@uniq,"\n"; '

it seems silly to have all this code when the following will work fine

ifconfig -a | grep "inet " | awk -F":" ' { print $2 } ' | cut -d " " -f1

perl -lne 'use POSIX; print strftime("%Y-%m-%d", localtime(time() - 86400));'
perl -e 'use Date::Calc qw(Today Week_Number); $weekn = Week_Number(Today); print "$weekn\n"'