Commands by LinuxMan (9)

  • A commandline version of the notepad in a browser: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/12161/notepad-in-a-browser-type-this-in-the-url-bar All credit to the origional author of this fantastic command, whos only failing as most of the comments pointed out was that it wasn't a command... well, now its a command. Send all upvotes to dtlp747.


    2
    firefox 'data:text/html, <html contenteditable>'
    LinuxMan · 2013-04-14 02:13:03 1
  • I don't know why anyone would use this, I was just messing around tonight and managed to start bash without using any letters and thought I would share. It's pretty simple, first it tries to execute "-" redirecting stderr to stdout which prints the error "bash: -: command not found" to standard output, then I try to execute "bash: -: command not found" which produces the output "bash: bash: -: command not found: command not found". lastly, (on the other side of the semicolon) I use the underscore environment variable which refers to the last command run ("bash: -: command not found") and take out everything after the first ":" character using brace expressions and your left with "bash" Show Sample Output


    6
    "$(- 2>&1)";${_%%:*}
    LinuxMan · 2012-12-29 09:21:09 2
  • Shows all configurations to apt and dpkg, rarely changed, you probably still have the default configuration. Go ahead and explore your configuration if you dare, perhaps change your apt-cache directory, Dir::Cache "var/cache/apt/"; or the names of the log files. Show Sample Output


    5
    apt-config dump
    LinuxMan · 2011-12-13 19:11:02 1
  • Normally, if you just want to see directories you'd use brianmuckian's command 'ls -d *\', but I ran into problems trying to use that command in my script because there are often multiple directories per line. If you need to script something with directories and want to guarantee that there is only one entry per line, this is the fastest way i know Show Sample Output


    -10
    ls -l | grep ^d | sed 's:.*\ ::g'
    LinuxMan · 2011-08-06 23:52:46 4
  • short enough to be tweetable Show Sample Output


    -3
    ifconfig | grep "inet\ " | grep -v "127.0" | sed -e 's/inet\ addr://g' | sed -e 's/Bcast:/\ \ \ \ \ \ \ /g' | cut -c 1-29 | sed -e 's/\ //g'
    LinuxMan · 2010-12-01 19:06:11 1
  • This command finds all of the functions defined in any shell script you specify including .bashrc


    0
    functions(){ read -p "File name> "; sort -d $REPLY | grep "(){" | sed -e 's/(){//g' | less; }
    LinuxMan · 2010-12-01 18:49:48 0
  • Never read the documentation? No, then why have that ~ 20 MB sit there and take up space? This command preserves directory structure wile removing all of those unnecessary help and documentation files. Works on Ubuntu, Debian, and most related systems. Gives a lot of directory errors, I'll fix those later.


    -12
    for i in {a..z};do sudo rm /usr/share/doc/$i*/*;done
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-23 01:52:25 2
  • Thanks th John_W for suggesting the fix allowing ~/ to be used when saving a directory. directions: Type in a url, it will show a preview of what the file will look like when saved, then asks if you want to save the preview and where you want to save it. Great for grabbing the latest commandlinefu commands without a full web browser or even a GUI. Requires: w3m Show Sample Output


    0
    read -p "enter url:" a ; w3m -dump $a > /dev/shm/e1q ; less /dev/shm/e1q ; read -p "save file as text (y/n)?" b ; if [ $b = "y" ] ; then read -p "enter path with filename:" c && touch $(eval echo "$c") ; mv /dev/shm/e1q $(eval echo "$c") ; fi ; echo DONE
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-13 22:36:38 2
  • Thanks to flatcap for optimizing this command. This command takes advantage of the ext4 filesystem's resistance to fragmentation. By using this command, files that were previously fragmented will be copied / deleted / pasted essentially giving the filesystem another chance at saving the file contiguously. ( unlike FAT / NTFS, the *nix filesystem always try to save a file without fragmenting it ) My command only effects the home directory and only those files with your R/W (read / write ) permissions. There are two issues with this command: 1. it really won't help, it works, but linux doesn't suffer much (if any ) fragmentation and even fragmented files have fast I/O 2. it doesn't discriminate between fragmented and non-fragmented files, so a large ~/ directory with no fragments will take almost as long as an equally sized fragmented ~/ directory The benefits i managed to work into the command: 1. it only defragments files under 16mb, because a large file with fragments isn't as noticeable as a small file that's fragmented, and copy/ delete/ paste of large files would take too long 2. it gives a nice countdown in the terminal so you know how far how much progress is being made and just like other defragmenters you can stop at any time ( use ctrl+c ) 3. fast! i can defrag my ~/ directory in 11 seconds thanks to the ramdrive powering the command's temporary storage bottom line: 1. its only an experiment, safe ( i've used it several times for testing ), but probably not very effective ( unless you somehow have a fragmentation problem on linux ). might be a placebo for recent windows converts looking for a defrag utility on linux and won't accept no for an answer 2. it's my first commandlinefu command Show Sample Output


    2
    find ~ -maxdepth 20 -type f -size -16M -print > t; for ((i=$(wc -l < t); i>0; i--)) do a=$(sed -n ${i}p < t); mv "$a" /dev/shm/d; mv /dev/shm/d "$a"; echo $i; done; echo DONE; rm t
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-07 04:29:22 6

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That will capture 200 seconds of video at fullscreen 1680x1050 resolution, but scaled down 25 percent, with 15 frames per second. http://fusioncast.blogspot.com/2007/09/infobyte-how-i-record-my-desktop.html

Start a terminal with three open tabs
If you launch gnome-terminal manually, you can start with three open tabs

fork performance test
grabbed from Andrew Aylett post: http://superuser.com/questions/133313/can-i-speed-up-cygwins-fork

export iPad, iPhone App list to txt file

Poor man's unsort (randomize lines)

return external ip
Get your ip address, hostname, ASN and geolocation information. If you want just one field as a text response you can also get that,eg curl ipinfo.io/ip

Add a progress counter to loop (see sample output)
For this hack you need following function: $ finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "$@" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: $ alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters.


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