Commands by brainstorm (8)

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Convert unix timestamp to date

Add 10 random unrated songs to xmms2 playlist
If you're like me and want to keep all your music rated, and you use xmms2, you might like this command. I takes 10 random songs from your xmms2 library that don't have any rating, and adds them to your current playlist. You can then rate them in another xmms2 client that supports rating (I like kuechenstation). I'm pretty sure there's a better way to do the grep ... | sed ... part, probably with awk, but I don't know awk, so I'd welcome any suggestions.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get creation date of a file on ext2-3-4 fs
Return the creation date of a file on ext2, 3, 4 filesystems, because stat command won't show it. Useful on ubuntu, debian, and else

find file/dir by excluding some unwanted dirs and filesystems
Consider using this cmd when: 1. You are planning to traverse a big directory. 2. There is a subdir you don't want find to decend to. (entirely ignore) 3. You don't want find to decend to any mounted filesystems under this dir. * The -xdev flag tells find do not go to other filesystems. * -path ./junk_dir -prune is the pattern to ignore ./junk_dir entirely. * The rest is the typical search and print. To ignore multiple subdirs, you can just iterate the pattern, e.g. find . -path ./junk1 -prune -o -path ./junk2 -prune ... If you do want to include other filesystems, then remove -xdev flag. If you want to search files, then change -type d to -type f.

post data with a http request

Flush DNS cache in MacOS 10.5

Check your unread Gmail from the command line
Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages. For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac: $ curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '' '{for (i=2; i

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Resume scp of a big file
It can resume a failed secure copy ( usefull when you transfer big files like db dumps through vpn ) using rsync. It requires rsync installed in both hosts. rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file local -> remote or rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $user@$host:$remote_file $destination_file remote -> local


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