Commands by brainstorm (8)

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Most Commonly Used Grep Options
This is very helpful to place in a shell startup file and will make grep use those options all the time. This example is nice as it won't show those warning messages, skips devices like fifos and pipes, and ignores case by default.

Use top to monitor only all processes with the same name fragment 'foo'
$ pgrep foo may return several pids for process foobar footy01 etc. like this: 11427 12576 12577 sed puts "-p " in front and we pass a list to top: $ top -p 11427 -p 12576 -p 12577

List Threads by Pid along with Thread Start Time
This command will list all threads started by a particular pid along with the start time of each thread. This is very valuable when diagnosing thread leaks.

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

convert video format to youtube flv format

Rename file to same name plus datestamp of last modification.
Note that the -i will not help in a script. Proper error checking is required.

create a simple version of ls with extended output
create a short alias for 'ls' with multi-column (-C), file type syntax additions (slashes after directories, @ for symlinks, etc... (-F), long format (-l), including hidden directories (all ./, ../, .svn, etc) (-a), show file-system blocks actually in use (-s), human readable file sizes (-h)

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

For finding out if something is listening on a port and if so what the daemon is.
See what's listening on your IPv4 ports on FreeBSD.

Combining text files into one file


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