Commands by kyle0r (4)

  • In this example, where the users gpg keyring has a password, the user will be interactively prompted for the keyring password. If the keyring has no password, same as above, sans the prompt. Suitable for cron jobs. ~/.gnupg/passwd/http-auth.gpg is the encrypted http auth password, for this particular wget use case. This approach has many use cases. example bash functions: function http_auth_pass() { gpg2 --decrypt ~/.gnupg/passwd/http-auth.gpg 2>/dev/null; } function decrypt_pass() { gpg2 --decrypt ~/.gnupg/passwd/"$1" 2>/dev/null; }


    1
    wget --input-file=~/donwloads.txt --user="$USER" --password="$(gpg2 --decrypt ~/.gnupg/passwd/http-auth.gpg 2>/dev/null)"
    kyle0r · 2012-12-13 00:14:55 0
  • From the cwd, recursively find all rar files, extracting each rar into the directory where it was found, rather than cwd. A nice time saver if you've used wget or similar to mirror something, where each sub dir contains an rar archive. Its likely this can be tuned to work with multi-part archives where all parts use ambiguous .rar extensions but I didn't test this. Perhaps unrar would handle this gracefully anyway?


    9
    find . -name '*.rar' -execdir unrar e {} \;
    kyle0r · 2012-09-27 02:27:03 0
  • the find -printf "%f\n" prints just the file name from the given path. This means directory paths which contain extensions will not be considered. Show Sample Output


    0
    find /some/path -type f -and -printf "%f\n" | egrep -io '\.[^.]*$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
    kyle0r · 2012-04-02 19:25:35 0
  • In this example, the command will recursively find files (-type f) under /some/path, where the path ends in .mp3, case insensitive (-iregex). It will then output a single line of output (-print0), with results terminated by a the null character (octal 000). Suitable for piping to xargs -0. This type of output avoids issues with garbage in paths, like unclosed quotes. The tr command then strips away everything but the null chars, finally piping to wc -c, to get a character count. I have found this very useful, to verify one is getting the right number of before you actually process the results through xargs or similar. Yes, one can issue the find without the -print0 and use wc -l, however if you want to be 1000% sure your find command is giving you the expected number of results, this is a simple way to check. The approach can be made in to a function and then included in .bashrc or similar. e.g. count_chars() { tr -d -c "$1" | wc -c; } In this form it provides a versatile character counter of text streams :) Show Sample Output


    1
    find /some/path -type f -and -iregex '.*\.mp3$' -and -print0 | tr -d -c '\000' |wc -c
    kyle0r · 2012-03-31 21:57:33 0

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