Commands tagged lynx (20)

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Find all files with root SUID or SGID executables
Discovering all executables on your system that can be run as another user, especially root, is critical for system security. The above command will find those files with have SUID or SGID bits set and are owned by the root user or group.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Import/clone a Subversion repo to a git repo

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Grep recursively for a pattern and open all files that match, in order, in Vim, landing on 1st match

sendEmail - easiest commandline way to send e-mail

Sort files by size

bulk rename files with sed, one-liner
Far from my favorite, but works in sh and with an old sed that doesn't support '-E'

Get all IPs via ifconfig
works on Linux and Solaris. I think it will work on nearly all *nix-es

Print number of mb of free ram
Here we instead show a more real figure for how much free RAM you have when taking into consideration buffers that can be freed if needed. Unix machines leave data in memory but marked it free to overwrite, so using the first line from the "free" command will mostly give you back a reading showing you are almost out of memory, but in fact you are not, as the system can free up memory as soon as it is needed. I just noticed the free command is not on my OpenBSD box.


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