Commands tagged lynx (20)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Paste the contents of OS X clipboard into a new text file

Create a 5 MB blank file via a seek hole
Similar to the original, but is much faster since it only needs to write the last byte as zero. A diff on testfile and testfile.seek will return that they are the same.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List bash functions defined in .bash_profile or .bashrc
If you issue the "set" command, you'll see a list of variables and functions. This command displays just those functions' names.

Auto-log commands
A quick alias I use right before logging into a server so that I have a log of the transactions as well as the ability to re-connect from another computer. Useful for when your boss says "what commands did you run again on that server?" and you had already closed the terminal ;) I wrapped it in a script now, with more features, but this is the heart of it. Never leave home without it.

Recursively change permissions on files, leave directories alone.

Piping Microphone Audio Over Netcat
Send microphone audio to another computer using netcat and arecord. Connect to the stream using "nc [other ip] 3333|aplay" You can set up two-way communication by piping audio the reverse direction on another port: Machine #1: $arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc -l 3333 &;nc -l 3334|aplay Machine #2: $$ip=[machine1_ip];arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc $ip 3334 &;nc $ip 3333|aplay

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

create pdf files from text files or stdout.


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