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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 367 results
rm -rf `find . -type f -name *.htm`
find | egrep "\.(ade|adp|bat|chm|cmd|com|cpl|dll|exe|hta|ins|isp|jse|lib|mde|msc|msp|mst|pif|scr|sct|shb|sys|vb|vbe|vbs|vxd|wsc|wsf|wsh)$"
2010-11-23 16:53:55
User: poulter7
Functions: egrep find

Returns any file in the folder which would be rejected by Gmail, if you were to send zipped version.

(Yes, you could just zip it and knock the extension off and put it back on the other side, but for some people this just isn't a solution)

find . -type f | while read line; do NEW_TS=`date -d@$((\`stat -c '%Y' $line\` + <seconds> )) '+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S'`; touch -t $NEW_TS ${line}; done
2010-11-18 14:03:32
User: angleto
Functions: find read touch

Increase the modification date for the files selected with the find command.

find . -type f -size +500M -exec du {} \; | sort -n
2010-11-09 18:15:44
Functions: du find sort
Tags: size find

Greater than 500M and sorted by size.

find / -type f -size +500M
find / -type f -size +548576 -printf "%s:%h%f\n"
find -iname '*mp3' -exec mid3iconv {} \;
2010-10-29 05:35:46
User: schlaegel
Functions: find

Some MP3s come with tags that don't work with all players. Also, some good tag editors like, EasyTAG output tags that don't work with all players. For example, EasyTAG saves the genre as a numeric field, which is not used correctly in Sansa MP3 players.

This command corrects the ID3 tags in MP3 files using mid3iconv, which comes with mutagen. To install Mutagen on Fedora use "yum install python-mutagen"

find . -type f ! -name "*.foo" -name "*.bar" -delete
2010-10-07 20:17:38
User: sh1mmer
Functions: find

This command is recursive and will delete in all directories in ".". It will find and delete all files not specified with ! -name "pattern". In this case it's file extensions. -type f means it will only find files and not directories. Finally the -delete flag ask find to delete what it matches. You can test the command by running it first without delete and it will list the files it will delete when you run it.

find ./ ! -name 'excludepattern' | xargs -i cp --parents {} destdir
2010-09-27 21:36:50
User: starchox
Functions: cp find xargs
Tags: find xargs cp

Preserve file structure when coping and exclude some file o dir patterns

find -regextype posix-egrep -regex ".*/[A-Z]{3}_201009[0-9]{2}.*" -printf "%f %s\n" | awk '{ SUM += $2;COUNT++ } END { print SUM/1024 " kb in " COUNT " files" }'
for i in $(find . -iname '*.html'); do sed '/String/d' $i > $i-tmp; mv $i-tmp $i; done
2010-09-21 14:35:18
User: cadu
Functions: find mv sed
Tags: sed find

Search in all html files and remove the lines that 'String' is found.

find . -name "*noticia*" -name "*jhtm*" -name "*.tpl" -exec grep -li "id=\"col-direita\"" '{}' \; | xargs -n1 mate
find . -iname '*.jpg' -type f -print0 |perl -0 -ne '$a+=-s $_;END{print "$a\n"}'
2010-09-12 13:14:12
Functions: find perl

This deals nicely with filenames containing special characters and can deal with more files than can fit on a commandline. It also avoids spawning du.

grep -ZlRr -e BAD_SCRIPT_LINE * |xargs -0 sed -i 's/BAD_SCRIPT_LINE//g'
2010-08-30 22:12:57
User: homoludens
Functions: grep sed xargs

recursive find and replace. important stuff are grep -Z and zargs -0 which add zero byte after file name so sed can work even with file names with spaces.

find . -type f -exec fgrep -l $'\r' "{}" \;
2010-08-20 23:26:56
User: putnamhill
Functions: fgrep find
Tags: find fgrep

Looking for carriage returns would also identify files with legacy mac line endings. To fix both types:

perl -i -pe 's/\r\n?/\n/g' $(find . -type f -exec fgrep -l $'\r' "{}" \;)
find . -type f -iname '*.flac' | while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done
2010-08-15 19:02:19
User: paulochf
Functions: find read

find . -type f -iname '*.flac' # searches from the current folder recursively for .flac audio files

| # the output (a .flac audio files with relative path from ./ ) is piped to

while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done

# for each line on the list:

# FILE gets the file with .flac extension and relative path

# FILENAME gets FILE without the .flac extension

# run flac for that FILE with output piped to lame conversion to mp3 using 192Kb bitrate

find . -type d -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -exec svn propset svn:ignore '*' {} \;
2010-08-15 03:45:57
User: tristan_ph
Functions: find

If you would like to ignore a directory including its subdirectory. For example, a tmp/ directory

ls | perl -lne '++$x{lc $1} if /[.](.+)$/ }{ print for keys %x'
2010-08-13 20:05:15
User: recursiverse
Functions: ls perl

All with only one pipe. Should be much faster as well (sort is slow). Use find instead of ls for recursion or reliability.

Edit: case insensitive

find /path/to/dir -type f -name '*.*' | sed 's@.*/.*\.@.@' | sort | uniq
2010-08-12 15:48:54
User: putnamhill
Functions: find sed sort

If your grep doesn't have an -o option, you can use sed instead.

find /path/to/dir -type f | grep -o '\.[^./]*$' | sort | uniq
find <dir> -name "<pattern>" | while read file; do echo -n .; output=$(<command>) || (echo ; echo $file:; echo "$output"; ); done
2010-08-10 11:45:31
User: Marco
Functions: echo find read

This is a command template for achiving the following:

* loop over files --> find -name "" | while read file; do ...; done

* output progress --> echo -n .

* execute some command on each file and save output for later usage --> output=$()

* if command failed, open subshell and echo newline --> || (echo;...;...;)

* echo output of command --> echo "$output"

find "$1" -iname "*$2*"
find . -iname \*${MYVAR}\* -print
2010-08-04 05:43:51
User: Buzzcp
Functions: find

You define your variable MYVAR with the desired search pattern:


...which can then be searched with the find command.

This is useful if you in a script, where you want the arguments to be fed into the find command.

The provided search is case insensitive (-iname) and will find all files and directories with the pattern MYVAR (not exact matches). This may go without saying, but if you want exact matches remove the \* and if you want case sensitive, use the -name argument.

find -maxdepth 1 -mtime 0 -type f
2010-07-30 01:56:34
User: adeverteuil
Functions: find
Tags: find today mtime

Then pipe to 'xargs ls' for a familiar listing, possibly using find's -print0 and xarg's -0 options.