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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 360 results
find . -name '*.?pp' -exec grep -H "string" {} \;
find . -name '*.?pp' | xargs grep -H "string"
2010-07-14 14:41:07
User: cout
Functions: find grep xargs
Tags: find xargs grep
2

I like this better than some of the alternatives using -exec, because if I want to change the string, it's right there at the end of the command line. That means less editing effort and more time to drink coffee.

find /usr/share/figlet -name *.?lf -exec basename {} \; | sed -e "s/\..lf$//" | xargs -I{} toilet -f {} {}
2010-07-13 20:12:54
Functions: basename find sed xargs
Tags: find
1

Lists a sample of all installed toilet fonts

find . -name .svn -exec rm \-rf {} \;
sudo arp-scan -I eth0 192.168.1.0/24
FOR /L %i IN (1,1,254) DO ping -n 1 10.254.254.%i | FIND /i "Reply">> c:\ipaddresses.txt
2010-06-29 21:02:21
Functions: ping
-9

documents all active ips on a subnet and saves to txt file.

for f in $(find /path/to/base -type f | grep -vw CVS); do grep -Hn PATTERN $f; done
find /protocollo/paflow -type f -mtime +5 | xargs tar -cvf /var/dump-protocollo/`date '+%d%m%Y'_archive.tar`
2010-06-29 12:43:30
User: 0disse0
Functions: find tar xargs
Tags: find tar dump
0

The following command finds all the files not modified in the last 5 days under /protocollo/paflow directory and creates an archive files under /var/dump-protocollo in the format of ddmmyyyy_archive.tar

find / -type f -name *.tar.gz -size +10M -exec ls -l {} \;
2010-06-29 12:39:02
User: 0disse0
Functions: find ls
Tags: find ls exec rm type
0

Please be careful while executing the following command as you don?t want

to delete the files by mistake. The best practice is to execute the same

command with ls ?l to make sure you know which files will get deleted when

you execute the command with rm.

find . -regextype posix-extended -not -regex '.*/[A-Za-z_]*([.][A-Za-z_]*)?'
2010-06-25 00:27:09
User: zhangweiwu
Functions: find
Tags: find iso9660
1

You might want to check what file and directory names would be renamed or chopped if you create iso 9660 level 2 image out of them. Use this command to check first.

quickfind () { find . -maxdepth 2 -iname "*$1*" }
2010-06-12 03:04:50
User: dbbolton
Functions: find
Tags: find function
1

A function that allows you to perform a case-insensitive search in the current directory, and directories in the current directory (but no further), for files containing the first argument anywhere in their names.

find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'
7

I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable.

find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50%

00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp

The key is:

# -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'

which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output.

You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions.

lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'<<<$@ &&O=;find $PWD $O -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -rgbS 50%; }

Personally I'm using this function because:

lll () { local a KS="1 -r -g"; sed -n '/-sort=/!Q1' <<< $@ && KS=`sed 's/.*-sort=\(.*\)/\1/g'<<<$@`; find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -k$KS -bS 50%; }

# i can sort by user

lll -sort=3

# or sort by group reversed

lll -sort=4 -r

# and sort by modification time

lll -sort=6

If anyone wants to help me make this function handle multiple dirs/files like ls, go for it and I would appreciate it.. Something very minimal would be awesome.. maybe like:

for a; do lll $a; done

Note this uses the latest version of GNU find built from source, easy to build from gnu ftp tarball. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

find ~/.thunderbird/*.default/ -name *.msf -delete
find ~/.thunderbird/*.default/ -name *.msf -print0 | xargs --no-run-if-empty -0 rm;
find ~/.thunderbird/*.default/ -name *.msf -exec rm -f {} \;
find ~/.thunderbird/*.default/ -name *.msf | sed 's/ /\\ /g' | xargs rm {} \;
2010-06-04 12:35:24
User: allrightname
Functions: find rm sed xargs
-1

The thunderbird message datastores get corrupt some times causing random failures, compaction to fail and general suck in thunderbird. Removing them causes thunderbird to rebuild the indexes and makes things quick again.

find -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort
2010-05-29 13:40:18
User: dooblem
Functions: find stat xargs
2

Works with files containing spaces and for very large directories.

watch 'find -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type d |xargs du -csh'
2010-05-19 13:13:57
User: shadycraig
Functions: du watch xargs
0

This command shows the size of directories below here, refreshing every 2s.

It will also track directories created after running the command (that what the find bit does).

for i in $(find ~/.config/chromium/*/Extensions -name 'manifest.json'); do n=$(grep -hIr name $i| cut -f4 -d '"'| sort);u="https://chrome.google.com/extensions/detail/";ue=$(basename $(dirname $(dirname $i))); echo -e "$n:\n$u$ue\n" ; done
2010-05-18 15:16:36
User: new_user
Functions: cut find grep
2

Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension.

With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH.

find . -type f -not -regex ".*\/.svn\/.*" -exec sed -i 's/oldstring/newstring/g' {} +
find /tmp -type f -atime +1 -delete
2010-05-11 17:08:49
User: mattoufoutu
Functions: find
5

Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} + | sort -n
2010-05-03 00:16:02
User: hackerb9
Functions: find sort wc
4

The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments.

This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) | xargs wc -l | sort -n
2010-04-30 12:21:28
User: rbossy
Functions: find sort wc xargs
Tags: find count
0

find -exec is evil since it launches a process for each file. You get the total as a bonus.

Also, without -n sort will sort by lexical order (that is 9 after 10).

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} \; | sort
2010-04-28 07:18:21
User: rkulla
Functions: find wc
Tags: find count code
2

Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

find ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/Cache -exec file {} \; | awk -F ': ' 'tolower($2)~/mpeg/{print $1}'
2010-04-19 06:59:55
User: sata
Functions: awk file find
2

Grab a list of MP3s (with full path) out of Firefox's cache

Ever gone to a site that has an MP3 embedded into a pesky flash player, but no download link? Well, this one-liner will yank the *full path* of those tunes straight out of FF's cache in a clean list.

Shorter and Intuitive version of the command submitted by (TuxOtaku)