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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

Commands using printf from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using printf - 162 results
printf "\ec"
2013-05-29 18:10:22
User: soroosh
Functions: printf

clear command doesn't actually clear the terminal because if you scroll you can still see output from the previous commands. Using this command you can clear your terminal screen as well as buffer.

alias clearscrollback='clear;printf %b "\033[3J"'
count='1'; for i in *.jpg; do mv $i $(printf '%01d'.jpg $count); (( count++ )); done
2013-02-20 06:38:25
User: lalanza808
Functions: mv printf

The '1' in '%01d' changes the amounts of digits in the integer, eg. 1 vs 0001.

awk '{for (i=9;i<=NF;i++) {printf "%s",$i; printf "%s", " ";}; printf "\n"}'
2013-02-12 13:57:43
User: adimania
Functions: awk printf
Tags: awk

It'll print the file names preserving the spaces in their names and adding new line after every new filename.

I wrote this to quickly find out how many files in any directory is owned by a particular user. This can be extended using pipe and grep to do much more.

find . -name '*.jpg' | awk 'BEGIN{ a=0 }{ printf "mv %s name%01d.jpg\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
2013-02-07 06:12:37
User: doublescythe
Functions: awk find printf

This command will take the files in a directory, rename them, and then number them from 1...N.

Black belt stuff.

Hell of a time saver.

today() { printf '%(%Y-%m-%d)T\n' -1; } ## bash-4
function up { cd $(eval printf '../'%.0s {1..$1}) && pwd; }
2013-01-21 12:57:45
User: michelsberg
Functions: cd eval printf
Tags: cd directory


up N

I did not like two things in the submitted commands and fixed it here:

1) If I do cd - afterwards, I want to go back to the directory I've been before

2) If I call up without argument, I expect to go up one level

It is sad, that I need eval (at least in bash), but I think it's safe here.

eval is required, because in bash brace expansion happens before variable substitution, see http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Repeat_a_string#Using_printf

while(true); do printf "%s\f" $(date +%T); sleep 1; done | sm -
2013-01-14 17:13:34
User: claudius
Functions: date printf sleep
Tags: time clock sm

http://www.joachim-breitner.de/projects#screen-message now also supports reading stdin continuously to update what it shows, different ?slides? separated by a form feed character. Here, we feed the current time into it each second to create a large clock.

for code in $(seq -w 0 255); do for attr in 0 1; do printf "%s-%03s %bTest%b\n" "${attr}" "${code}" "\e[${attr};38;05;${code}m" "\e[m"; done; done | column -c $((COLUMNS*2))
2013-01-13 18:23:44
User: claudius
Functions: column printf seq
Tags: bash color colors

Shows the ?rendering? for each of the 256 colours in both the bold and normal variant. Using seq is helpful to get even lines, passing $((COLUMNS*2)) to column sort-of-handles the nonprintable characters.

tshark -r *.eth -S -R "ajp13" -d tcp.port==9009,ajp13 -s 0 -l -V | awk '/Apache JServ/ {p=1} /^ *$/ {p=0;printf "\n"} (p){printf "%s\n", $0} /^(Frame|Internet Pro|Transmission Control)/ {print $0}'
2013-01-10 21:12:51
User: tsureshkumar
Functions: awk printf
Tags: tshark

if you have a capture file *.eth, and ajp protocol is in use on port 9009, you can paste the above command. You can change the fiile and port name

du . | sort -nr | awk '{split("KB MB GB TB", arr); idx=1; while ( $1 > 1024 ) { $1/=1024; idx++} printf "%10.2f",$1; print " " arr[idx] "\t" $2}' | head -25
2012-12-03 02:59:13
User: agas
Functions: awk du head printf sort

Lists the size in human readable form and lists the top 25 biggest directories/files

while true; do printf "\e[32m%X\e[0m" $((RANDOM%2)); for ((i=0; i<$((RANDOM%128)); i++)) do printf " "; done; done
2012-11-27 10:40:42
User: seb1245
Functions: printf

Unlike other alternatives, this command only relies on bash builtins and should also work on windows platforms with the bash executable.

Sparseness corresponds to the number 128 and can be adjusted. To print all possible digits instead of only 0 and 1 replace RANDOM%2 by RANDOM%10 or RANDOM%16 to add letters [A-F].

hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') B=$(printf '\033[0;46m') R=$(printf '\033[0m') np=$(env printf "\u00A0\uFEFF"); sed -e "s/\t/${C}&#9657;&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}&#8267;$R/" -e "s/[$np]/${B}& $R/g";}
2012-11-07 10:09:40
User: unhammer
Functions: env printf sed

Can't see it here, but the non-breaking space is highlighted :)

Of course,

cat -t -e

achieves something similar, but less colourful.

Could add more code points from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_%28punctuation%29#Spaces_in_Unicode

hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') R=$(printf '\033[0m'); sed -e "s/\t/${C}&#9657;&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}&#8267;$R/";}
2012-11-07 09:55:48
User: unhammer
Functions: printf sed

I don't think it's possible to give a (background) colour to the tab itself, since a tab is, IIUC, simply a command to the terminal to move to the right. Nevertheless, this "highlighting" can be helpful when working with tab-separated files.

for i in `ls /var/log/sa/|grep -E "sa[0-9][0-9]"`;do echo -ne "$i -- ";sar -r -f /var/log/sa/$i|awk '{ printf "%3.2f\n",($4-$6-$7)*100/(3+$4)}'|grep -Eiv "average|linux|^ --|0.00|^-" |awk '{sum+=$1 }END{printf "Average = %3.2f%%\n",sum/NR}';done
/sbin/ifconfig |awk '/bond|eth/{getline i;printf $0" ";printf "%s\n", i" "}'|awk '{print $1,substr($7,6)}'
find -maxdepth 3 -type d | while read -r dir; do printf "%s:\t" "$dir"; find "$dir" | wc -l; done
2012-10-15 15:00:09
User: brainstorm
Functions: find printf read wc

Counts the files present in the different directories recursively. One only has to change maxdepth to have further insight in the directory hierarchy.

Found at unix.stackexchange.com:


echo -e "\e[32m"; while :; do printf '%*c' $(($RANDOM % 30)) $(($RANDOM % 2)); done
2012-09-25 17:36:25
Functions: echo printf
Tags: random Matrix

Prints 0's and 1's in The Matrix style. You can easily modify to print 0-9 digits using $RANDOM %10 insted of %2.

grep -H voluntary_ctxt /proc/*/status |gawk '{ split($1,proc,"/"); if ( $2 > 10000000 ) { printf $2 " - Process : "; system("ps h -o cmd -p "proc[3]) } }' | sort -nk1,1 | sed 's/^/Context Switches: /g'
2012-09-01 19:43:47
User: jperkster
Functions: gawk grep printf sed sort

This command will find the highest context switches on a server and give you the process listing.

for ((i=65;i<91;i++)); do printf "\\$(printf '%03o' $i) "; done
alarmclock() { [ $1 ] || echo Parameter TIME is missing. 1>&2 && return 1 ; ( sleep $1 ; for x in 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ; do for y in `seq 0 $[ 10 - $x ] ` ; do printf "\a"; sleep 0.$x ; done ; done ) & }
2012-08-16 15:35:15
User: lkj
Functions: echo printf return sleep

usage: alarmclock TIME

TIME is a sleep(1) parameter which tells function how long to wait until raise the alarm.

printf "%s," "${LIST[@]}" | cut -d "," -f 1-${#LIST[@]}
2012-06-04 14:56:12
User: Valise
Functions: cut printf

printf reapeats the format as longer as it has arguments. Then the idea is to make cut retain as much fields as we have elements in the array.

As usual with such join/split string manipulation, you have to make sure you don't have conflicts between your separator and your array content.

find /proc/sys/vm -maxdepth 1 -type f | while read i ; do printf "%-35s\t%s\n" "$i" "$(<$i)" ; done | sort -t/ -k4
2012-05-25 16:34:16
User: SEJeff
Functions: find printf read sort

Sometimes you want to see all of the systcls for a given $thing. I happened to need to easily look at all of the vm sysctls between two boxes and compare them. This is what I came up with.

members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
2012-05-20 11:34:33
User: eduo
Functions: cut grep printf read

Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership.

NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname.

printf "%$(tput cols)s\n"|tr ' ' '='
2012-04-21 23:26:55
Functions: printf tr

Use tput cols to find the width of the terminal and set it as the minimum field width.