Commands by splante (8)

  • This is an alternative to #9131. ffmpeg didn't work on my .au files, though it did on the .wav ones. Also useful if you don't have ffmpeg but do have sox. Handily, sox already reports in seconds (decimal). Show Sample Output


    3
    get_duration() { durline=$(sox "$1" -n stat 2>&1|grep "Length (seconds):");echo ${durline#*\: }; }
    splante · 2011-09-02 15:22:43 1
  • Shorter, easier to remember version of cmd#7636 NTP is better, but there are situations where it can't be used. In those cases, you can do this to sync the local time to a server. Show Sample Output


    37
    date --set="$(ssh user@server date)"
    splante · 2011-08-30 20:03:06 3
  • This is an alternative to another command using two xargs. If it's a command you know there's only one of, you can just use: ls -l /proc/$(pgrep COMMAND)/cwd Show Sample Output


    3
    eval ls -l /proc/{$(pgrep -d, COMMAND)}/cwd
    splante · 2011-04-14 13:41:58 4
  • This is regarding the command 8263 using an alias to fill in command line options for psql. You can actually just type 'psql'. In order for that to work, you want to set environment variables PGDATABASE, PGHOST, PGUSER, and (except you're using the default) PGPORT. Also, you can add a line "host:port:dbname:user:password" (asterisk ok in some columns) to your ~/.pgpass file. Finally, if you don't like the aligned columns, you can add the line "\pset format unaligned" to your ~/.psqlrc file.


    2
    psql
    splante · 2011-04-08 18:35:20 0
  • Admittedly, I'd never have thought of this without the earlier examples, but here's one that you can execute from your workstation to just display the image from another, without separately doing a file transfer, etc. By the way, I hear a loud beep coming from the other room, so I guess it's not too stealthy :-D


    12
    ssh user@remote-host "DISPLAY=:0.0 import -window root -format png -"|display -format png -
    splante · 2011-04-08 01:07:41 1
  • The "type" builtin command is handy to find out what executable will be used if you issue a command. But on some distros, particularly when using /etc/alternatives, certain executables get buried under layers and layers of symbolic links and it becomes hard to find which one. If you put the above command in your .bashrc, it adds a "-c" option to the type command that will weed through the symbolic links and prints the actual file that will be executed. Show Sample Output


    0
    type () { if [ "$1" = "-c" ]; then shift; for f in "$@"; do ff=$(builtin type -p "$f"); readlink -f "$ff"; done; else builtin type $typeopts "$@"; fi; }
    splante · 2011-04-07 18:57:51 0
  • Credit goes to brun65i but he posted it as a comment instead as an alternative. I hadn't noticed the -h option on sort before and this seems like the cleanest alternative. Thanks Brun65i! Show Sample Output


    0
    du -h --max-depth=1 | sort -hr
    splante · 2011-04-07 18:01:18 0
  • ksh's version of cd has an optional syntax where you can type "cd old new" and it will replace "old" with "new" in your current directory and take you there. This is very handy when you have a parallel directory structure, like source and object directories. As suggested, you can just type cd ${PWD/old/new} to get this in bash, but this function in your .bashrc will let you type the ksh cd syntax and avoid typing the special characters while preserving other cd functionality. Show Sample Output


    0
    cd () { cdop=""; while [ "$1" != "${1#-}" ]; do cdop="${cdop} ${1}"; shift; done; if [ $# -eq 2 ]; then newdir="${PWD/$1/$2}"; [ -d "${newdir}" ] || { echo "no ${newdir}"; return 1; }; builtin cd $cdop "${newdir}"; else builtin cd $cdop "$@"; fi }
    splante · 2011-04-07 14:36:26 0

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List open TCP/UDP ports

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Commandline document conversion with Libreoffice
In this example, the docx gets converted to Open Document .odt format. For other formats, you'll need to specify the correct filter (Hint: see "Comments" link below for a nice list).

Rename files in batch

improve copy file over ssh showing progress
You set the file/dirname transfer variable, in the end point you set the path destination, this command uses pipe view to show progress, compress the file outut and takes account to change the ssh cipher. Support dirnames with spaces. Merged ideas and comments by http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4379/copy-working-directory-and-compress-it-on-the-fly-while-showing-progress and http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3177/move-a-lot-of-files-over-ssh

Monitor all DNS queries seen by the local machine

check open ports without netstat or lsof

pdfcount: get number of pages in a PDF file

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Adding Prefix to File name
Good old bracket expansion :-) For large numbers of files, "rename" will spare you the for-loop, or the find/exec...


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