Commands by TetsuyO (5)

  • Finds files modified today since 00:00, removes ugly dotslash characters in front of every filename, and sorts them. *EDITED* with the advices coming from flatcap (thanks!)


    -2
    find -maxdepth 1 -type f -newermt "00:00" -printf "%f\n" | sort
    TetsuyO · 2013-03-23 12:50:01 4
  • This oneliner gets all the 'modified' files in your git repository, and opens all of them in vim. Very handy when you're starting to work in the morning and you simply want to review your modified files before committing them. Maybe there are better ways to do that (and maybe integrated in vim and/or git, who knows), but I found quicker to do this oneliner.


    0
    vim `git status | grep modified | awk '{print $3}'`
    TetsuyO · 2012-11-19 09:48:46 2
  • Substitute that 724349691704 with an UPC of a CD you have at hand, and (hopefully) this oneliner should return the $Artist - $Title, querying discogs.com. Yes, I know, all that head/tail/grep crap can be improved with a single sed command, feel free to send "patches" :D Enjoy! Show Sample Output


    -1
    wget http://www.discogs.com/search?q=724349691704 -O foobar &> /dev/null ; grep \/release\/ foobar | head -2 | tail -1 | sed -e 's/^<div>.*>\(.*\)<\/a><\/div>/\1/' ; rm foobar
    TetsuyO · 2011-01-30 23:34:54 0
  • This is an example of the usage of pdfnup (you can find it in the 'pdfjam' package). With this command you can save ink/toner and paper (and thus trees!) when you print a pdf. This tools are very configurable, and you can make also 2x2, 3x2, 2x3 layouts, and more (the limit is your fantasy and the resolution of the printer :-) You must have installed pdfjam, pdflatex, and the LaTeX pdfpages package in your box. Show Sample Output


    3
    pdfnup --nup 2x1 --frame true --landscape --outfile output.pdf input.pdf
    TetsuyO · 2010-12-21 14:20:06 0
  • Quick and dirty version. I made a version that checks if a manpage exists (but it's not a oneliner). You must have ps2pdf and of course Ghostscript installed in your box. Enhancements appreciated :-)


    53
    man -t manpage | ps2pdf - filename.pdf
    TetsuyO · 2010-12-19 22:40:18 5

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Get backup from remote host, then expand in current directory using tar


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