Commands using find (1,239)

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Look for IPv4 address in files.
It finds a SNMP OID too :-(

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Create a tar archive with all files of a certain type found in present dir and subdirs
Note: the tar archive must not exist in order to create it. If exists it will only be updated and no already existent files in present search will still remain in the tar archive. The update option has to be used instead of create because the command tar may be executed more than once depending on the number of arguments that find throws. You can see maximum number of arguments with 'getconf ARG_MAX'

Batch File Rename with awk and sed

VIM subst any char different from literal " + EOL with searched string + white space
---- this line ends here but must be concatenated with this one "this line ends here" and should NOT be concatenated with this one

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Print all git repos from a user (only curl and grep)

get header and footer of file for use with scalpel file carving
file carving helps if you know where the file you are looking for starts and ends. It's also an easy way to get data and catalog them for future use with forensic tools like scalpel.

identify exported sonames in a path
This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be $ scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.


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