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Commands using echo from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using echo - 1,256 results
echo $[RANDOM % 2]
echo $[RANDOM % 100] # range 0-99
2013-05-25 19:02:00
User: anapsix
Functions: echo
-2

use it to stagger cronjob or to get a random number

increase the range by replacing 100 with your own max value

ls -1 | while read file; do new_file=$(echo $file | sed s/\ /_/g); mv "$file" "$new_file"; done
for i in *.pdf; do echo --------$i-------; echo; pdftotext $i - | grep -i Yourpattern; done
2013-05-22 05:36:06
User: fangfufu
Functions: echo grep
Tags: grep pdf
0

This command is useful for searching through a whole folder worth of pdf files.

cat domainlist.txt | while read line; do echo -ne $line; whois $line | grep Expiration ; done | sed 's:Expiration Date::'
echo lowercaseword | tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'
git-createrepo() { repos_path='/srv/git/'; mkdir $repos_path$1; cd $repos_path$1; git init --bare; echo "Repository location: ssh://$USER@`cat /etc/HOSTNAME``pwd`"; cd -; }
2013-05-09 21:44:24
User: batandwa
Functions: cd echo init mkdir
Tags: git
-3

Creates a git repository in a predefined location.

find . -name .git -print0 | while read -d $'\0' g; do echo "$g"; cd "$g"; git gc --aggressive; cd -; done
2013-05-09 08:03:23
User: Tungmar
Functions: cd echo find read
0

git gc should be run on all git repositories every 100 commits. This will help do do so if you have many git repositories ;-)

ps -o rss= -C Chrome | (x=0; while read rss; do ((x+=$rss)); done; echo $((x/1024)))
ps -e -m -o user,pid,args,%mem,rss | grep Chrome | perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if / (\d+)$/' | ( x=0;while read line; do (( x += $line )); done; echo $((x/1024)) );
echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
2013-05-07 19:41:40
User: fangfufu
Functions: echo
Tags: kernel
0

Well, this is quite useful for testing if your hardware watchdog is working properly.

=() { echo $(($*)); }
2013-05-03 04:27:07
User: xlz
Functions: echo
3

POSIX compliant arithmetic evaluation.

= 10*2+3

find -maxdepth 1 -type d | while read dir; do echo $dir; echo cmd2; done
echo ?ls -l? | at midnight
echo ?ls -l? | at 10am Jul 21
for i in `pidof java`; do echo $i; ll /proc/$i; done;
2013-04-26 08:01:21
User: cuizhaohua
Functions: echo
0

list all java process info.

sudo su; sync; echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
echo 'Etc/UTC' | tee /etc/timezone; dpkg-reconfigure --frontend noninteractive tzdata
2013-04-22 06:14:55
User: donatello
Functions: echo tee
0

Replace the first part of the command above with the appropriate timezone string. Eg: 'Europe/London' or for UTC - 'Etc/UTC'. The appropriate string can be found from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tz_database_time_zones

This is useful when your server is installed by a data centre (managed hardware, VPS, etc) and the timezone is not usually set to the one your prefer.

echo 'Dir.foreach("/usr/local/Cellar/cowsay/3.03/share/cows") {|cow| puts cow; system "fortune | cowsay -f /usr/local/Cellar/cowsay/3.03/share/cows/#{cow}" }' | ruby
2013-04-15 12:27:38
User: orkoden
Functions: echo
-1

Shows a list of all installed cows saying a fortune. Also lists the cows names. Pic your favorite cow!

Needs cowsay, fortune and ruby installed. The path only applies to OS X with cowsay installed using homebrew. On Linux it might be /usr/share/cowsay/cows/ or similar. Uses ruby just because.

OIFS=$IFS;IFS=$':';for i in $(cat -n /etc/passwd);do echo -n $i\ ** \ ;done
for i in $(objdump -d binary -M intel |grep "^ " |cut -f2); do echo -n '\x'$i; done;echo
apt-get install phpmyadmin; echo "Include /etc/phpmyadmin/apache.conf" >> /etc/apache2/apache2.conf; service apache2 restart
2013-04-06 16:20:55
User: ZEROF
Functions: apt echo install
0

This command will install phpmyadmin, set apache2 server and restart apache2. After running this command you can open phpmyadmin on http://yoursite.com/phpmyadmin

for ii in $(find /path/to/docroot -type f -name \*.php); do echo $ii; wc -lc $ii | awk '{ nr=$2/($1 + 1); printf("%d\n",nr); }'; done
2013-04-05 19:06:17
Functions: awk echo find wc
0

I have found that base64 encoded webshells and the like contain lots of data but hardly any newlines due to the formatting of their payloads. Checking the "width" will not catch everything, but then again, this is a fuzzy problem that relies on broad generalizations and heuristics that are never going to be perfect.

What I have done is set an arbitrary threshold (200 for example) and compare the values that are produced by this script, only displaying those above the threshold. One webshell I tested this on scored 5000+ so I know it works for at least one piece of malware.

function google { Q="$@"; GOOG_URL='https://www.google.de/search?tbs=li:1&q='; AGENT="Mozilla/4.0"; stream=$(curl -A "$AGENT" -skLm 10 "${GOOG_URL}${Q//\ /+}" | grep -oP '\/url\?q=.+?&amp' | sed 's|/url?q=||; s|&amp||'); echo -e "${stream//\%/\x}"; }
2013-04-05 08:04:15
User: michelsberg
Functions: echo grep sed
Tags: google
13

Put it in your ~/.bashrc

usage:

google word1 word2 word3...

google '"this search gets quoted"'

Q="YOURSEARCH"; GOOG_URL="http://www.google.com/search?q="; AGENT="Mozilla/4.0"; stream=$(curl -A "$AGENT" -skLm 10 "${GOOG_URL}\"${Q/\ /+}\"" | grep -oP '\/url\?q=.+?&amp' | sed 's/\/url?q=//;s/&amp//'); echo -e "${stream//\%/\x}"
2013-04-03 09:56:41
User: techie
Functions: echo grep sed
Tags: google
8

I found this command on a different site and thought you guy might enjoy it. Just change "YOURSEARCH" to what ever you want to search. Example, "Linux Commands"