Commands by dbbolton (28)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Visualizing system performance data

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Run a script in parrallel over ssh
Runs a local script over ssh assuming ssh keys are in place. -P argument prints results to stdout. # Uses - https://code.google.com/p/parallel-ssh/

Function to output an ASCII character given its decimal equivalent

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

find all active IP addresses in a network
You send a unicast ICMP packet to each host. Many firewalls will drop that ICMP. However, in order to send the ICMP, you'll have first done an ARP request and the remote machine is unlikely to ignore that, so the computer will be in your ARP table.

Rename all files which contain the sub-string 'foo', replacing it with 'bar'
That is an alternative to command 8368. Command 8368 is EXTREMELY NOT clever. 1) Will break also for files with spaces AND new lines in them AND for an empty expansion of the glob '*' 2) For making such a simple task it uses two pipes, thus forking. 3) xargs(1) is dangerous (broken) when processing filenames that are not NUL-terminated. 4) ls shows you a representation of files. They are NOT file names (for simple names, they mostly happen to be equivalent). Do NOT try to parse it. Why? see this :http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs Recursive version: $ find . -depth -name "*foo*" -exec bash -c 'for f; do base=${f##*/}; mv -- "$f" "${f%/*}/${base//foo/bar}"; done' _ {} +

Count number of files in a directory


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: