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Terminal - Commands tagged function - 108 results
function _xterm_cwds() { for pid in $(pidof -- -zsh) $(pidof zsh); do reply+=$(readlink /proc/$pid/cwd) done }; function xcd() { cd $1 }; compctl -K _xterm_cwds xcd
2012-07-12 19:59:46
User: aartur
Functions: cd pidof readlink
0

It gives a 'xcd' command for changing directory to one of CWDs of other ZSH processes (typically running in a terminal emulator). Useful for single-windowed terminal emulators like XTerm or Rxvt which don't have ability to pass CWD of one shell to another.

members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
2012-05-20 11:34:33
User: eduo
Functions: cut grep printf read
-1

Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership.

NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname.

function have_here { find "${@:-.}" -type d \( -name .git -o -name .svn -o -name .bzr -o -name CVS -o -name .hg -o -name __pycache__ \) -prune -o -type f -print; }
2012-05-20 05:31:26
User: syscomet
Functions: find
Tags: function
0

Ever done a find to get content and been messed up by .git, .svn, .hg or the like spamming your results? Did you really want to grep over every copy of the file that existed in your git history?

Replace:

grep -r PATTERN .

with:

grep PATTERN -- $(have_here)

or if you really have too many files to put in one argv:

have_here | xargs grep PATTERN --
regenerateCSR () { openssl genrsa -out $2 2048; openssl x509 -x509toreq -in $1 -out $3 -signkey $2; }
mkgo newdir
calc() { echo "scale=4; ${*//,/.}" | bc -l; }
2011-10-24 19:58:20
User: fpunktk
Functions: bc echo
-1

This is an "argument calculator" funktion. The precision is set to 4 and you can use dot (.) or comma (,) as decimal mark (which is great for german users with a comma on the numpad).

python -ic "from __future__ import division; from math import *; from random import *"
2011-10-24 19:47:27
User: fpunktk
Functions: python
1

This opens a python command line. You can use math and random and float-division is enabled (without appending .0 to integers). I just don't know how to specify a standard precision.

alias calc='python -ic "from math import *; from random import *"'
2011-10-24 08:15:41
User: Bonster
Functions: alias
0

use python as calculator, press ctrl+d to exit

reminder: when doing factions add atleast one decimal number like so

22.0/7 or 22/7.0

xpath () { xmllint --format --shell "$2" <<< "cat $1" | sed '/^\/ >/d' }
2011-10-05 07:45:16
User: sharfah
Functions: sed
0

This function uses xmllint to evaluate xpaths.

Usage: xpath /some/xpath XMLfile

quietly() { "$@" > /dev/null 2>&1; }
sshmysql() { ssh -L 13306:127.0.0.1:3306 -N $* & }
2011-09-01 10:21:55
Functions: ssh
-1

Create a secure tunnelled connection for access to a remote MySQL database.

For example, connect with MySQL Workbench to root@127.0.0.1:13306.

timeDNS () { { for x in "${local_DNS}" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do ({ echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query ; }|sponge &) done ; } | sort -n -k5 ; }
2011-08-18 01:11:53
Functions: dig echo grep sort
1

Evoke from the command like as:

timeDNS commandlinefu.com

.

This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o.

.

I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1).

.

You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`.

.

If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this:

.

DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; }

lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
2011-08-15 03:10:58
User: h3xx
Functions: find ls sort xargs
2

Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too.

On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login:

LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto'

and

alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS'

which works great.

mergepdf() { gs -q -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -sOutputFile=merged.pdf "$@" }
2011-07-28 11:12:15
Functions: gs
1

This is an expansion on a previous entry, which I've wrapped in a function and placed in my profile. The "$@" is a positional parameter, much like "$*", but the parameters are passed on intact, without interpretation or expansion; so you can simply call the function like this:

mergepdf *

This will output a merged PDF of all PDFs in the current directory. Alternatively, you can simply list them like so:

mergepdf 00.pdf 01.pdf 02.pdf ...

N.B. Passing a wildcard will merge all PDFs in the current directory in name order, e.g. 00.pdf 01.pdf aa.pdf ab.pdf

alias cdd="history -a && grep '^ *[0-9]* *cd ' ~/.bash_history| tail -10 >>~/.bash_history && history -r ~/.bash_history"
2011-07-13 09:44:16
User: knoppix5
Functions: alias
1

This alias is meant to append n (here is n=10) most recently used cd commands to the bottom of history file. This way you can easily change to one of previous visited directories simply by hitting 1-10 times arrow up key.

Hint: You can make more aliases implying the same rule for any set of frequently used long and complex commands like: mkisof, rdesktop, gpg...

map() { if [ "$1" != "" ]; then alias $1="cd `pwd`"; fi }
2011-07-11 15:46:19
User: javidjamae
Functions: alias
1

Put the function in your .bashrc and use "map [alias]" to create the alias you want. Just be careful to not override an existing alias.

find_alternatives(){ for i;do which "$i" >/dev/null && { echo "$i"; return 0;};done;return 1;}
2011-01-06 19:53:46
User: eightmillion
Functions: echo return which
-1

This function is used to set environmental variables from a list of alternatives depending on what's installed on the system. It returns the first program found in the list.

Example usage:

export BROWSER=$(find_alternatives chromium-browser google-chrome opera firefox firefox-bin iceweasel konqueror w3m lynx)

.

export EDITOR=$(find_alternatives vim nano pico emacs kate)

.

export PAGER=$(find_alternatives vimpager less most more pg)
flipf(){ if [ -f "$1" -a -f "$2" ]; then mv "$1" "$1.$$" && mv "$2" "$1" && mv "$1.$$" "$2" || echo "$!"; else echo "Missing a file: $!"; fi; }
qrurl() { curl -sS "http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=200x200&cht=qr&chld=H|0&chl=$1" -o - | display -filter point -resize 600x600 png:-; }
2010-12-16 04:42:05
User: __
4

like 7300, but doesn't clutter your working directory with old qr.*.png files. This will get the QR barcode, and send it right into ImageMagick's 'display' tool. Usage is the same as 7300; just call this function followed by the URL:

qrurl http://xkcd.com
buf() { cp -v $1 ${1/${1%%.*}/$f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")};}
buf() { f=${1%%.*};e=${1/$f/};cp -v $1 $f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")$e;}
2010-12-15 09:50:04
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
0

"infix" version in bash (4.x+)

Remove -v to make it silent.

BTW: The OP forgot to use "cat" and "nmap" ;-) I had a good laugh though.

buf () {oldname=$1; if [ "$oldname" != "" ]; then datepart=$(date +%Y-%m-%d); firstpart=`echo $oldname | cut -d "." -f 1`; newname=`echo $oldname | sed s/$firstpart/$firstpart.$datepart/`; cp -i ${oldname} ${newname}; fi }
2010-12-14 19:58:34
User: Seebi
Functions: cp cut date sed
-3

This backup function preserve the file suffix allowing zsh suffix aliases and desktop default actions to work with the backup file too.

buf () { cp $1{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }
2010-12-14 14:02:03
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
2

1. you don't need to prepend the year with 20 - just use Y instead of y

2. you may want to make your function a bit more secure:

buf () { cp ${1?filename not specified}{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }

typeset -f <function name>; declare -f <function name>
2010-11-24 15:59:42
User: unefunge
3

no need to reinvent the wheel.

Thanks to the OP for the "obsolete" hint. 'declare' may come in pretty handy on systems paranoid about "up-to-dateness"

bm () { ... see description }