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Terminal - Commands tagged function - 100 results
xpath () { xmllint --format --shell "$2" <<< "cat $1" | sed '/^\/ >/d' }
2011-10-05 07:45:16
User: sharfah
Functions: sed
0

This function uses xmllint to evaluate xpaths.

Usage: xpath /some/xpath XMLfile

quietly() { "$@" > /dev/null 2>&1; }
sshmysql() { ssh -L 13306:127.0.0.1:3306 -N $* & }
2011-09-01 10:21:55
Functions: ssh
-1

Create a secure tunnelled connection for access to a remote MySQL database.

For example, connect with MySQL Workbench to root@127.0.0.1:13306.

timeDNS () { { for x in "${local_DNS}" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do ({ echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query ; }|sponge &) done ; } | sort -n -k5 ; }
2011-08-18 01:11:53
Functions: dig echo grep sort
0

Evoke from the command like as:

timeDNS commandlinefu.com

.

This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o.

.

I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1).

.

You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`.

.

If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this:

.

DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; }

lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
2011-08-15 03:10:58
User: h3xx
Functions: find ls sort xargs
2

Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too.

On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login:

LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto'

and

alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS'

which works great.

mergepdf() { gs -q -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -sOutputFile=merged.pdf "$@" }
2011-07-28 11:12:15
Functions: gs
1

This is an expansion on a previous entry, which I've wrapped in a function and placed in my profile. The "$@" is a positional parameter, much like "$*", but the parameters are passed on intact, without interpretation or expansion; so you can simply call the function like this:

mergepdf *

This will output a merged PDF of all PDFs in the current directory. Alternatively, you can simply list them like so:

mergepdf 00.pdf 01.pdf 02.pdf ...

N.B. Passing a wildcard will merge all PDFs in the current directory in name order, e.g. 00.pdf 01.pdf aa.pdf ab.pdf

alias cdd="history -a && grep '^ *[0-9]* *cd ' ~/.bash_history| tail -10 >>~/.bash_history && history -r ~/.bash_history"
2011-07-13 09:44:16
User: knoppix5
Functions: alias
1

This alias is meant to append n (here is n=10) most recently used cd commands to the bottom of history file. This way you can easily change to one of previous visited directories simply by hitting 1-10 times arrow up key.

Hint: You can make more aliases implying the same rule for any set of frequently used long and complex commands like: mkisof, rdesktop, gpg...

map() { if [ "$1" != "" ]; then alias $1="cd `pwd`"; fi }
2011-07-11 15:46:19
User: javidjamae
Functions: alias
1

Put the function in your .bashrc and use "map [alias]" to create the alias you want. Just be careful to not override an existing alias.

find_alternatives(){ for i;do which "$i" >/dev/null && { echo "$i"; return 0;};done;return 1;}
2011-01-06 19:53:46
User: eightmillion
Functions: echo return which
-1

This function is used to set environmental variables from a list of alternatives depending on what's installed on the system. It returns the first program found in the list.

Example usage:

export BROWSER=$(find_alternatives chromium-browser google-chrome opera firefox firefox-bin iceweasel konqueror w3m lynx)

.

export EDITOR=$(find_alternatives vim nano pico emacs kate)

.

export PAGER=$(find_alternatives vimpager less most more pg)
flipf(){ if [ -f "$1" -a -f "$2" ]; then mv "$1" "$1.$$" && mv "$2" "$1" && mv "$1.$$" "$2" || echo "$!"; else echo "Missing a file: $!"; fi; }
qrurl() { curl -sS "http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=200x200&cht=qr&chld=H|0&chl=$1" -o - | display -filter point -resize 600x600 png:-; }
2010-12-16 04:42:05
User: __
4

like 7300, but doesn't clutter your working directory with old qr.*.png files. This will get the QR barcode, and send it right into ImageMagick's 'display' tool. Usage is the same as 7300; just call this function followed by the URL:

qrurl http://xkcd.com
buf() { cp -v $1 ${1/${1%%.*}/$f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")};}
buf() { f=${1%%.*};e=${1/$f/};cp -v $1 $f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")$e;}
2010-12-15 09:50:04
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
0

"infix" version in bash (4.x+)

Remove -v to make it silent.

BTW: The OP forgot to use "cat" and "nmap" ;-) I had a good laugh though.

buf () {oldname=$1; if [ "$oldname" != "" ]; then datepart=$(date +%Y-%m-%d); firstpart=`echo $oldname | cut -d "." -f 1`; newname=`echo $oldname | sed s/$firstpart/$firstpart.$datepart/`; cp -i ${oldname} ${newname}; fi }
2010-12-14 19:58:34
User: Seebi
Functions: cp cut date sed
-3

This backup function preserve the file suffix allowing zsh suffix aliases and desktop default actions to work with the backup file too.

buf () { cp $1{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }
2010-12-14 14:02:03
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
2

1. you don't need to prepend the year with 20 - just use Y instead of y

2. you may want to make your function a bit more secure:

buf () { cp ${1?filename not specified}{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }

typeset -f <function name>; declare -f <function name>
2010-11-24 15:59:42
User: unefunge
3

no need to reinvent the wheel.

Thanks to the OP for the "obsolete" hint. 'declare' may come in pretty handy on systems paranoid about "up-to-dateness"

bm () { ... see description }
bm() { export BM${1?"bookmark name missing"}="$PWD" ; }; forget() { unset BM${1?"bookmark name missing"} ; }
2010-11-19 12:15:11
User: unefunge
Functions: export unset
1

pushd and popd are your friends, but sometimes they're just incompatible with the way one works...

Two shell functions:

bm bookmarkname - "bookmarks" the current directory, just 'cd $BMbookmarkname' to return to it.

forget bookmarkname - unsets the 'bookmarkname' variable. It isn't mandatory, they cease to exist when the session ends.

wget -O xkcd_$(date +%y-%m-%d).png `lynx --dump http://xkcd.com/|grep png`; eog xkcd_$(date +%y-%m-%d).png
for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
2

This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop.

I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env).

This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM.

aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "$@";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; }

And my printenv replacement is:

alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"'

From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

atb() { l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.tar.gz} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.tar.gz}; fi ;}
2010-10-16 05:50:32
User: elfreak
Functions: echo grep head mkdir tar wc
10

This Anti-TarBomb function makes it easy to unpack a .tar.gz without worrying about the possibility that it will "explode" in your current directory. I've usually always created a temporary folder in which I extracted the tarball first, but I got tired of having to reorganize the files afterwards. Just add this function to your .zshrc / .bashrc and use it like this;

atb arch1.tar.gz

and it will create a folder for the extracted files, if they aren't already in a single folder.

This only works for .tar.gz, but it's very easy to edit the function to suit your needs, if you want to extract .tgz, .tar.bz2 or just .tar.

More info about tarbombs at http://www.linfo.org/tarbomb.html

Tested in zsh and bash.

UPDATE: This function works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in zsh (not working in bash):

atb() { l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)}; fi ;}

UPDATE2: From the comments; bepaald came with a variant that works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in bash:

atb() {shopt -s extglob ; l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.t@(ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.t@(ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)}; fi ; shopt -u extglob}
for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done
2

While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source.

Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read.

t ()

{

local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' ';

trap 'exec 66

exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f;

while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do

a=${l/% */};

$c,$a k -${a//%/} -A;

yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a;

done

}

awk "BEGIN{ print $* }"
2010-10-07 16:13:41
User: maelcum
Functions: awk
4

works with fractions like 1/3.5

calc() { bc <<< $*; }
calc() { python -c "from math import *; print $1"; }
2010-10-07 08:26:39
User: asmaier
Functions: python
1

This function defines a command line calculator that handles everything pythons math module can handle, e.g. trigonometric functions, sqrt, log, erf, ... (see http://docs.python.org/library/math.html). It even knows about the constants pi and e.